asifyouknow's Blog
Views
1649
Comments
10

Jimmie Johnson and Chad Knaus plan a wreck and Kyle Busch executes one, which one is the bigger crime.

Matt Kenseth wrecks Brian Vickers at Martinsville in retaliation, Kyle Busch wrecks Ron Hornaday in Friday nights Truck race also in retaliation, again, which one is the bigger crime.

Do you remember when Jeff Burton wrecked Jeff Gordon at Texas last year, did anyone get parked. NO

Folks, if you're a NASCAR fan you know we could come up with hundreds of situations that mirrors what happened Friday night in Texas.

So why is Jimmie Johnson and Chad Knaus still in the game, why is Matt Kenseth on the grid this Sunday.

The biggest question is why was Kyle Busch parked for the cup race.

I'm in my fifth year as a NASCAR fan, I fallowed Juan Pablo Montoya from F1, to this day I honestly can tell you I DON'T understand the inconsistency of NASCAR's rule enforcement.

I dearly call their rules book (if there is one)  "rubber book" because they appear to bend and stretch the rules, at times it's hard to believe they are not playing favorites.

Do you think Dale Jr. would of gotten the same treatment.

You know, rubbing is racing but it all depends who is the ruber and who is the rubee, I don't think those are real words but you get the point.

It appears to me NASCAR rules by the seat of their pants, they wing it, they are reactionary and that may be do to the fact that a tribal type organisation controls the sport, a group of elders if you will.

All other mayor sports are governed by a board of owners, please correct me if I'm wrong, I would bet if that was the case in NASCAR, Kyle Busch, who is one of a few young stars in NASCAR, would be in a car this Sunday in Texas.

Like to ask you folks one question:

Do you think NASCAR made it clear to the drivers what the boundaries were for the "have at it boys" era or did they just closed their eyes and hoped for the best.

As my brother always told me, "be careful what you wish for..... you might just get it"

Nascar got it and now they don't like it.

As always this is a fans opinion and I understand everybody has one and I thank for God for that.

Enough said.

 

November 7, 2011  01:46 PM ET

NASCAR's consistency is they are inconsistent. They rule for who they want and against who they want. And they lack the transparency shown in other leagues. Most professional sports have their rulebooks posted in a way where fans can get a chance to see and read said rules. NASCAR is the only "major" sport who doesn't. And for a sport who once prided itself as the sport of the Everyman it's a shame.

Now as for the "fairness" of the punishment. Broken up because I think there will be an issue with length...

November 7, 2011  01:50 PM ET

JJ and CK only talked about damaging the rearend, at Talladega. At this point that is no different then me saying "I'm going to punch you in the nose." until I actually do it there is nothing a person of authority can do to me. And no I'm not going to punch you in the nose I was just using that as an example. :)

Kensith and Vickers wrecked one another under green at a track where the maximum speed you are running is 110 mph. Someone gets hit in the rear, the spin out and the car more often then not hits the wall back first.

November 7, 2011  02:31 PM ET

Kyle wrecked Hornaday at a track with speeds of over 190 mph going into the turns, an average of 180 mph, and it was under caution.

The biggest fault being that it was under caution. In that case you have people walking around away from the safety of the retaining walls and in many cases in the racing groove the cars run in. What would have happened if someone was picking up debris of something on the apron of the track where the #33 truck finally stopped, they would have been run over. Caution speeds are slower to protect the fragile human bodies of the cleanup personnel. Had the race gone back to green and Kyle tagged Hornaday he would have been sat out the rest of the Truck race, as protocol has been seen before at similar sized tracks, but he would have been racing on Saturday and Sunday.

Speed is also a factor. The 18 and 33 were probably running at speeds of 140+ mph in the turn and Kyle hooked Hornaday at and angle where he hit the wall almost head on. Yes the cars/trucks are much safer now, but a head on hit at those speeds can still cause serious injury. And it is not like Kyle wasn't being told what NOT to do. In the replays, you can hear either the spotter or the crew chief trying to talk Kyle down.

November 7, 2011  02:41 PM ET

I definitely think NASCAR goes issue by issue when they punish people. In some cases, that works. But they don't have a set guidelines for which drivers should follow, and that can confuse the drivers sometimes too. If they were smart, they'd sit down this winter and make out a complete rule book and stick to that rule book. Otherwise, they'll continue to take criticism and continue to take heat for how they handle one situation different than the other.

November 7, 2011  03:30 PM ET
QUOTE(#4):

But they don't have a set guidelines for which drivers should follow

And I don't think they want set guidelines, because right now it is NASCAR's word against yours and in that case NASCAR always wins. They have stacked the deck in their favor and any transparency will weaken their control.

You see it in the appeal process. When a driver or owner are penalized they can appeal the penalty most of the time. The appeal goes to an "impartial" committee of 3 people, mainly former drivers, engineers, etc. selected by NASCAR I believe.

Last year Richard Childress appealed a 150 point/$150,000 fine for a rear bumper being too high on a car after the race. Childress's defense was the car ran out of gas after the race and was pushed by a tow truck. The tow truck's front bumper damaged the rear bumper of the car and that is why it was out of spec. An expert crime scene recreationist was brought in to give expert opinion for the defense. Childress made his case first, was moved out of the room while NASCAR gave their case, and the committee ruled against Childress. It was said the committee wasn't even interested in what the expert had to say probably because they already ruled against Childress before he showed up.

November 7, 2011  09:53 PM ET
QUOTE(#1):

NASCAR's consistency is they are inconsistent. They rule for who they want and against who they want. And they lack the transparency shown in other leagues. Most professional sports have their rulebooks posted in a way where fans can get a chance to see and read said rules. NASCAR is the only "major" sport who doesn't. And for a sport who once prided itself as the sport of the Everyman it's a shame.Now as for the "fairness" of the punishment. Broken up because I think there will be an issue with length...

good comment my friend..

November 7, 2011  09:59 PM ET
QUOTE(#4):

I definitely think NASCAR goes issue by issue when they punish people. In some cases, that works. But they don't have a set guidelines for which drivers should follow, and that can confuse the drivers sometimes too. If they were smart, they'd sit down this winter and make out a complete rule book and stick to that rule book. Otherwise, they'll continue to take criticism and continue to take heat for how they handle one situation different than the other.

As I stated I've been a fan for 5 year (F1 ..Indy before that) I'm also a fan of all major sports and this sort of reminds me of the QB protection rule in the NFL, looks like they are just working through it and writing the rules book as they go.....does that sound about right...

November 7, 2011  10:04 PM ET
QUOTE(#5):

And I don't think they want set guidelines, because right now it is NASCAR's word against yours and in that case NASCAR always wins. They have stacked the deck in their favor and any transparency will weaken their control.You see it in the appeal process. When a driver or owner are penalized they can appeal the penalty most of the time. The appeal goes to an "impartial" committee of 3 people, mainly former drivers, engineers, etc. selected by NASCAR I believe.Last year Richard Childress appealed a 150 point/$150,000 fine for a rear bumper being too high on a car after the race. Childress's defense was the car ran out of gas after the race and was pushed by a tow truck. The tow truck's front bumper damaged the rear bumper of the car and that is why it was out of spec. An expert crime scene recreationist was brought in to give expert opinion for the defense. Childress made his case first, was moved out of the room while NASCAR gave their case, and the committee ruled against Childress. It was said the committee wasn't even interested in what the expert had to say probably because they already ruled against Childress before he showed up.

Raistwalker what do you think of this line I wrote, is there some truth to that:

"It appears to me NASCAR rules by the seat of their pants, they wing it, they are reactionary and that may be do to the fact that a tribal type organisation control the sport, a group of elders if you will."

November 8, 2011  09:19 AM ET
QUOTE(#8):

Raistwalker what do you think of this line I wrote, is there some truth to that:

"It appears to me NASCAR rules by the seat of their pants, they wing it, they are reactionary and that may be do to the fact that a tribal type organisation control the sport, a group of elders if you will."

Some truth yes, but I think less tribal elders and more an Emperor and his Court (advisers)

The Emperor, Brian France, thinks things should run the way HE wants them to be run. In France's case every race needs a dramatic last lap pass coming out of the last turn and a drag race to the finish line.

It is the Court's job to make that happen. That is why we tend to see extra long cautions toward the end of the race (to get to a green-white-checker finish), inconstancy with penalties, "lucky breaks" for certain drivers, etc. And to do this you have to hide or at the very least gray out the rulebook because if you have specific rules/penalties in black and white then someone can use that same rulebook against you as a governing organization.

The Emperor is parading around in his "new clothes" the problem is the Court is telling him he looks great, while the people (the fans) are getting fed up and leaving.

 
November 8, 2011  11:45 AM ET

lmao...that is just a great awnser...lol

Comment

Remember to keep your posts clean. Profanity will get filtered, and offensive comments will be removed.


Start Your Own Blog

Start Now

Truth & Rumors

MOST POPULAR

  1. 1
    Clippers, Warriors exchange barbs
    Views
    767
    Comments
    436
  2. 2
    Time to penalize NHL's perennial losers?
    Views
    963
    Comments
    273
  3. 3
    Report: Raiders to release Terrelle Pryor on Monday
    Views
    1278
    Comments
    59
  4. 4
    Will NFL owners blackball Donald Trump?
    Views
    1087
    Comments
    54
  5. 5
    Packers lovers have own dating site
    Views
    983
    Comments
    45

SI.com

SI Photos