NFL  > General NFL  > helmet to helmet = suspensions
October 17, 2010, 11:53 PM
I saw a few hits today that were complete personal fouls. The hit on Cribbs, the hit on Addai I think there were three or four more in which I saw highlights .
The league keeps saying they are going to put a stop to these concussion/ career ending type hits. I am not a fan of coddling QB's or players, but these helmet leading hits should be illegal and hefty fines and game suspensions should be levied.
October 17, 2010  11:57 PM ET

the DeSean Jackson hit with the Falcons DB was scary...

Comment #3 has been removed
October 18, 2010  12:11 AM ET

The plays in question will be doubly reviewed, that is; they are observed by the referees during the course of the game, and tape is reviewed after the fact, to ascertain if there was an egregious foul committed, penalty or not. As far as the 2 big hits leveled by Harrison today, the hit on Cribbs was a lateral blow that involved both shoulder pads/helmet. Cribbs was operating as a RB, not a QB and was not under any "special protection" per the rules. The hit on Massaquoi wasn't anything particularly offensive, except for the intensity....most players do NOT go out to intentionally injure other players, but, as Harrison stated after the game, he is "not above hurting another player....."

The DeSean Jackson hit reminded me alot of the Gary Clark/Willis McGahee collision a couple of years ago....again, not illegal, just brutal...

October 18, 2010  03:50 AM ET

QUOTE (#7):
I thought the hit on cribbs was dirty at best!

Your entitled to you opinion, Dawn... But think about this, Harrison came all the way over from his opposite end position, through traffic and with a bad angle, and caught Cribbs just at the line of scrimmage. He didn't put a head-on helmet on him, but hit him shoulder to shoulder ( and helmet to helmet incidentally ). It wasn't so much the technique of the hit, but the sheer force of the blow that sent Cribbs out of the game. Cribbs is a big boy and knows the risks of placing himself in the way of harm ( ie Harrison, et al ). Before today, he had been very lucky and successful in his efforts at tormenting the Steelers in the past. Today, his luck ran out...

October 18, 2010  09:29 AM ET

Go back to leather, maybe the players wouldn't be so apt to use their heads as battering rams that way.

October 18, 2010  09:47 AM ET
QUOTE(#13):

Go back to leather, maybe the players wouldn't be so apt to use their heads as battering rams that way.

That's a good idea and you can also go back to pads circa 1950 so we'll be back to arm tackling; hell you can't already touch a QB without a flag, you may as well.

October 18, 2010  11:40 AM ET
QUOTE:

You make valid points, and I love a good clean hit, but concussions this year are out of control.Is the NFL doing all that it can?In post-concussion syndrome, symptoms do not resolve for weeks, months, or years after a concussion, and may occasionally be permanent.[70] Symptoms may include headaches, dizziness, fatigue, anxiety, memory and attention problems, sleep problems, and irritability.[71] There is no scientifically established treatment, and rest, a recommended recovery technique, has limited effectiveness.[62] Symptoms usually go away on their own within months.[24] The question of whether the syndrome is due to structural damage or other factors such as psychological ones, or a combination of these, has long been the subject of debate.[59]

There is a price you pay for playing in the NFL - and that price is injuries.

"The injury rate in the NFL is 100%" - Ray Lewis.

Part of that IS concussions. The players have gotten bigger, stronger and faster over the years and the field is no bigger. You're going to have big collisions and sometimes helmets are going to hit just out of momentum.

You can't fine that and you can't keep it from happening.

I remember Jack Tatum clotheslining Swann in the neck during the 1975 AFCCG and Swann was unconcious before fell down. That was intentional and that's why that was made illegal.

You can legislate some stuff like that to make things safer but you have to realize that there is so much velocity and mass that helmets will hit even when the initial hit was shoulder to chest.

That's why they wear them.

October 18, 2010  12:56 PM ET

A retired player commented on this subject and mentioned he put back x amount of dollars for fines, a price he was willing to pay for the big hitter title, he also mentioned a game suspension hurt more than a fine does, this could be a trending topic in the NFL and should be taken in a serious nature in light of all the concussion conversation going in recent weeks.

October 18, 2010  02:45 PM ET

Love this thread and the thoughtful comments being made. Consider this angle: The NFL has been and is now the #1 sport in the country. Why is that ? I assert that no other American(inter-galactic for that matter) spectator sport compares in terms of the mix of skill, grace, power, strength AND violence. Clearly we all collectively like to watch the "must see game of the week" because we expect a very competitive game with the winner normally being the most "Physically Dominant" team. Who doesn't like to watch the "Smash Mouth" rivalry games ? If the competition rules continue to "over-rotate" towards the player protection, primarily the playes on offense, will the game itself not be fundamentally altered and reduced to an "arena football" type of entertainment ? Consider as well that we now have so many ways and angles from which to replay events on the field at "super slow motion" speeds. If you have ever played competitive football, even two hand tag, you should be able to recall that in realtime everything happens much faster and reaction times are split second affairs. for a defensive player to hesistate to ask himself "Did or will the receiver catch the ball or not ?, is the wr in a so called defenseless state or not?" Call me ruthless, but I think it's pretty easy to seperate and decipher those occassions when a pass is errant and the WR is truly defenseless from the closer calls, when a defender must make a play / effort to break up the pass or a timed hit on the intended receiver. Train up the refs better or go to IR when someone gets their bell rung and judge from there.

October 18, 2010  03:02 PM ET
QUOTE(#6):

The plays in question will be doubly reviewed, that is; they are observed by the referees during the course of the game, and tape is reviewed after the fact, to ascertain if there was an egregious foul committed, penalty or not. As far as the 2 big hits leveled by Harrison today, the hit on Cribbs was a lateral blow that involved both shoulder pads/helmet. Cribbs was operating as a RB, not a QB and was not under any "special protection" per the rules. The hit on Massaquoi wasn't anything particularly offensive, except for the intensity....most players do NOT go out to intentionally injure other players, but, as Harrison stated after the game, he is "not above hurting another player....."The DeSean Jackson hit reminded me alot of the Gary Clark/Willis McGahee collision a couple of years ago....again, not illegal, just brutal...

Agreed. Football can be a brutal sport, but hard hits aren't illegal.

October 18, 2010  03:04 PM ET
QUOTE:

I thought the hit on cribbs was dirty at best!

How was it dirty then? The hit was from the side and Cribbs was bent over so Harrison wasn't intentionally going for the head.

If the rules stipulate that you can't hit high (head shot) and you can't hit low (knee shot) where else can you hit? In the middle, right where Harrison was.

October 18, 2010  03:12 PM ET

October 18, 2010  03:21 PM ET
QUOTE(#30):

How was it dirty then? The hit was from the side and Cribbs was bent over so Harrison wasn't intentionally going for the head. If the rules stipulate that you can't hit high (head shot) and you can't hit low (knee shot) where else can you hit? In the middle, right where Harrison was.

I can understand going after head hunters...guys that go helmet to helmet intentionally...but the NFL has to realize that hit like Harrison gave Cribbs was simply out of momentum. Nothing dirty about it. No need for a fine or suspension in cases like that.

October 18, 2010  03:25 PM ET
QUOTE:

wasn't cribbs in the end zone.... maybe I was looking at another hit... I saw so many yesterday, my head still hurts.

Nope. Cribbs was running the wildcat when Woodley started to tackle him and Harrison finished him off.

October 18, 2010  03:27 PM ET
QUOTE:

thanks.... he led with his helmet....JMO

See comment 36.

Remember, these plays are taking place in a span of seconds. Harrison is assisting with a tackle, not being an intentional head hunter.

October 18, 2010  03:28 PM ET

I like big hits and De-cleaters but it's different when you use the crown of the helmet like a weapon JMO.

October 18, 2010  03:31 PM ET
QUOTE:

Suspending rather than fining players is the only way to stop this trend. These petty fines are a drop in the bucket to these rich athletes.

But do you suspend a player when the helmet to helmet was incidental - as it was with Harrison hitting Cribbs?

October 18, 2010  03:40 PM ET

Anybody remember the Darryl Stingley got paralyzed from the waist down on a hit from Jack Tatum. 1978 The hit compressed Stingleys spinal cord, breaking his fourth and fifth vertebrae. He eventually regained limited movement in his right arm, but spent the rest of his life as a quadriplegic. Hits are a part of the NFL and accidents due happen but when you're a head hunter and intentionally go out to injure another player it puts a totally different spin on things.

October 18, 2010  03:47 PM ET
QUOTE(#41):

But do you suspend a player when the helmet to helmet was incidental - as it was with Harrison hitting Cribbs?

That's your opinion, the league will review it and decide if any further action is needed, in my opinion he lined up Cribbs and ear holed him with the crown of his helmet, in slow motion you can see him lining up the shot at about the .40 mark of the video. In the end none of our opinions matter and it's out of our hands and in the hands of the NFL.

 
October 18, 2010  04:11 PM ET

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