MMA  > General MMA  > GZFS Videos (Aka Watch Clouis Lose)
November 23, 2010, 04:58 PM
Well, here are the videos.

I'm the fat guy in the red shorts. I must mention that I weighed in at 237 for the one this spring, then trained and wrestled in the 220 class this time. I am still too fat. Somewhere under me there is a 170 pounder in decent shape. I was in better cardio shape than my opponents, but I was unable to outlast them to when it mattered. First guy looks like Lesnar. I wonder how much weight he cut to get to 220.



I faired much better against the second guy, but after the worst shot ever (I misjudged the distance big time) I pulled guard and nearly tapped him with a forearm across the throat. Then I swept him, and got arm barred by one of the ugliest armbars ever. I wanted him to try for the armbar so I could achilles lock him. But I played around too long and he sunk it in.



Now commence mocking me.
Comment #1 has been removed
November 23, 2010  05:44 PM ET

Writing e-mail to you now Clouis, with the thoughts/ mistakes you asked for.

November 23, 2010  05:53 PM ET

(I can paste the comments here for discussion, or we can keep them private, as you prefer)

Comment #4 has been removed
November 23, 2010  05:58 PM ET

Ok, this is the e-mail I sent Clouis:

I watched the 2nd video first:

- Well, the shot was indeed strange, but doesn't really matter.

- When the guy was in your closed guard you should have (at least tried) to control his head. One hand on one of his wrists and the other one on the back of his head; without the GI that's the only way, basically, of controlling his posture. Once the guy is postured it is very hard to get him back down, where you want him.

- I don't understand why you opened the guard (when he passed to half-guard).

- In the half-guard your left arm/ hand should've been placed on his knee or hip; allows you to control him and possibly get the space to get the closed guard back.

- The ugly part in the half-guard is basically what the guy was doing to you. His weight was completely "out there" and, most baffling, he wasn't controlling your head.

- Also in the half-guard and, whenever possible, you should have tried to underhook his left arm with your right one. That's the best way to start sweeps from the half-guard. He didn't do anything with it though.

- 2:09: you're in his closed guard. NEVER leave your hands on the mat (and you did that often). That's the best way to get swept, kimura'ed or something else. The preferred posture is you having your hands on his mid chest and your elbows on the outside of his hips, so you can effectively control his hip movement.

- 2:51: get your hips to the front, so he can't sweep you, pick one side and shove his knee to the guard, so you can pass

- When he had that ugly armbar on you what you should have immediately done was going back to your knees. Whenever you're standing and he has an armbar, either it's really loose or you're actually helping him to stretch your arm. He had your left arm so you should have spun to your right side (which you did), get down on your knees and apply as much weight and pressure as you can on his legs, driving him back, not allowing him to stretch it; placing your right knee next to his head. After that you can slowly work towards getting your arm out. And you shouldn' have stepped over.

November 23, 2010  05:58 PM ET

1st video:

- The guy started fast and furious. Oh well. Side control: defend your mount with your left leg on top of your right one;

- On side control, in that position you were in, never leave your right arm like that, it's too exposed. Work to get it across his throat, with your hand close to his right shoulder. Your left forearm (can't really see where you had it) should be on his hip.

- Mount: can't really see what you were doing there. Place your elbows so he can't advance his knees on you. Then work for an upa bridge escape or hip escape to one side. Your arms behind his body, in a body lock, work well in an MMA fight so you can't get punched; in this case it's just stalling.

- I know it's easier said than done but never allow your opponent to flatten you out. A flatten body is an immobile one, an easy prey.

- It's 02:11 and the guy is breathing HEAVILY. Just a comment about his cardio. But he sure does look strong though.

- He submitted you with a power move, basically. Definitely more strength than technique. I don't know what to tell you about that, because when you got to that position there wasn't much you could do. Clench your fist, that gives your more strength to repel attempts at controlling your arms.

All in all I focused on what you could have done better but it's very important that you competed and you also had good moments, namely base in scrambles.

Keep training and competing, things can only get better!

November 24, 2010  12:41 AM ET
QUOTE(#1):

Whatever bro. It takes balls to get in there and compete. When you were in top position against the 2nd guy in his guard, how much did you want to posture up and ground and pound Mark Coleman style?

Very much.

What I was working for there was an Achilles lock. I came close to rolling for it, I wish I had

Comment #9 has been removed
Comment #10 has been removed
November 24, 2010  10:27 AM ET
QUOTE(#10):

You had a couple of decent sweeps too. Keep working at it. Its a long process.

Not to bad for someone who has never stepped foot in a BJJ gymm huh?

I bet there aren't many people who can succeed any better having only watched on TV.

Comment #12 has been removed
November 24, 2010  10:32 AM ET
QUOTE(#6):

- It's 02:11 and the guy is breathing HEAVILY. Just a comment about his cardio. But he sure does look strong though.

I noticed this big time during the match. When he was on top of me I was chinning him in the solar plexus to help keep him from catching his breath.

When he had the armbar locked in, I should have underhooked with my right arm and exploded. I was close to hooking my leg over and I could have gotten it with an underhook on that side. The I could have either ended up in back mount with one hook or in knee on belly on him. He was sooo tired, I wasn't even breathing hard after the match. If I could have gotten on top and controlled for a minute, I think I could have worked either a side choke or a Monson Choke from top.

Thinking about that stuff kept me up all that night.

November 24, 2010  10:43 AM ET
QUOTE(#5):

Ok, this is the e-mail I sent Clouis:I watched the 2nd video first:- Well, the shot was indeed strange, but doesn't really matter.- When the guy was in your closed guard you should have (at least tried) to control his head. One hand on one of his wrists and the other one on the back of his head; without the GI that's the only way, basically, of controlling his posture. Once the guy is postured it is very hard to get him back down, where you want him.- I don't understand why you opened the guard (when he passed to half-guard).- In the half-guard your left arm/ hand should've been placed on his knee or hip; allows you to control him and possibly get the space to get the closed guard back.- The ugly part in the half-guard is basically what the guy was doing to you. His weight was completely "out there" and, most baffling, he wasn't controlling your head.- Also in the half-guard and, whenever possible, you should have tried to underhook his left arm with your right one. That's the best way to start sweeps from the half-guard. He didn't do anything with it though.- 2:09: you're in his closed guard. NEVER leave your hands on the mat (and you did that often). That's the best way to get swept, kimura'ed or something else. The preferred posture is you having your hands on his mid chest and your elbows on the outside of his hips, so you can effectively control his hip movement.- 2:51: get your hips to the front, so he can't sweep you, pick one side and shove his knee to the guard, so you can pass- When he had that ugly armbar on you what you should have immediately done was going back to your knees. Whenever you're standing and he has an armbar, either it's really loose or you're actually helping him to stretch your arm. He had your left arm so you should have spun to your right side (which you did), get down on your knees and apply as much weight and pressure as you can on his legs, driving him back, not allowing him to stretch it; placing your right knee next to his head. After that you can slowly work towards getting your arm out. And you shouldn' have stepped over.

-The shot was brutal. I exploded but mistimed the level change and ended up ramming shoulders. I also never thought "I will pull guard." I really wanted to be on top of him, hence the immediate shot. Why I pulled guard I'll never know, but it did kind of work out.

-I agree.

-I don't know either.

-Once I got him in the half guard I put the reverse lock down on, and the first time I cranked it a little he got this look of pain on his face. Do I kept working for it.

-When I put the forarm across his throat my intention was to use it to get the underhook. But he just kept driving into it and making these aweful faces and sounds. He was ready to tap from it. The amazing thing to me was that he just kept driving into the forearm, when he could have just stopped. After that I just tried to keep the pressure on his throat, to what end I don't really know. I even tried a knuckle choke from half guard bottom, if you caught that part.

The guy actually found me and my brother and father afterwards, and told me that he was very close to tapping from the forearm. He said I was,"destroying him from the bottom". This almost upset me cause it told me that he knew very little about BJJ, to nearly tap from such a technique.

November 24, 2010  10:44 AM ET
QUOTE(#12):

Except maybe Evan Tanner.

Haha, yes.

Striking is more of my gig, and after I get some BJJ lessons under my belt this spring, I should have an Amateur MMA video for you guys.

November 24, 2010  11:04 AM ET
QUOTE(#9):

Nice breakdown Hyped. I plan on using some of those tips against my buddies.

Just don't forget they're your buddies :)

November 25, 2010  07:26 PM ET
QUOTE(#16):

Just don't forget they're your buddies :)

Buddies squeal the loudest

Good for you for making it in even without experience
Hypen broke it down very well but the best advice i can give is roll as much as you can

November 26, 2010  09:55 AM ET

That's awesome CLouis, that you were able to participate in something like this.

November 26, 2010  04:35 PM ET
QUOTE(#17):

the best advice i can give is roll as much as you can

Absolutely. There's no substitute for hours spent on the mat.

More hours rolling means, as many BJJ practitioners call it, "muscle memory". Making your moves without even thinking.

November 27, 2010  09:22 PM ET

Go C!

 
November 29, 2010  09:51 AM ET

very cool C...you are one big mofo too..lol

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