NCAAF  > General NCAAF  > SEC vs THE WORLD....
January 15, 2011, 06:55 AM
The SEC seams awful dominate lately....NOT being a SEC fan...What will it take to get some of the lesser conferences to be more competitive? Reorganization? Better recruiting? Offer more money to the players?
January 15, 2011  09:27 AM ET

Examining NFL rosters shows that former SEC players dominate the defensive lines. IMO, other leagues need to attract some better D-lineman to level the playing field...if possible. There may not be enough of those to go around. That really seems to be the only position that is extremely tilted toward the SEC. Again, just my opinion though.

January 15, 2011  10:02 AM ET

I think one of the things that surprised Oregon was, in addition to the size of the Dline, was their speed...they got to the ball quicker than other teams had.

I know, I know...SEC Speed...LOL...but ask the Ducks....

Comment #3 has been removed
January 15, 2011  10:46 AM ET
QUOTE(#2):

I think one of the things that surprised Oregon was, in addition to the size of the Dline, was their speed...they got to the ball quicker than other teams had.I know, I know...SEC Speed...LOL...but ask the Ducks....

Yep, line speed is the main difference that has been in place now for years. The Texas teams, OU, and USC had it as well at times. Not really sure why no one else has had it across the board like the big SEC teams have.

That being said, quick releases and no-huddles seem to work when they are employed effectively (Oregon only did it right one drive and Utah did it to Bama in the Sugar Bowl). Brute force works too on occasion (the few B10 bowl wins over the SEC). Also, its not like every SEC team gets these dudes, on any given year there seems to be only 2 or 3 dominate d-lines-the average B10 or P10 D-line is probably better than UK's or Vandy's.

January 15, 2011  10:59 AM ET
QUOTE(#3):

I'll beat the oversigning drum again...it tilts competitive balance to the SEC West in particular, as member schools within that division are the most blatent users of the practice.

HM...if over signing is such a "tilter", and it isn't against the NCAA rules (it is recommended to limit to 25), then why don't the Big 10 schools over-sign? And don't tell me because they are so committed to doing the right thing.

I really don't see the plus here...they can only actually give so many scholarships, so they talk the kid into a gray shirt semester....

Not understanding it....

January 15, 2011  11:04 AM ET

Most 5 or 6-A schools in Mississippi probably have better D-lines than UK or Vandy....

South Panola could probably beat Vandy...

IMHO

Comment #7 has been removed
January 15, 2011  12:00 PM ET
QUOTE(#7):

The short answer is that the Big Ten does exert tighter institutional control on recruitment in their conference. So, yes, they try to do the right thing.Greyshirting, abuse of medical redshirting is tantamount to warehousing potential starters for your team as natural attrition (matriculation, NFL, injuries, flunkouts, etc.) take place.It is a current loophole that needs to be closed by the NCAA. The way I see it, is that all other things being equal, if a school/division/conference is engaged in institutionalized oversigning, the evidence mounts over time for it becoming a competitive advantage. The SEC's dominance in recent years (especially the West division) is manifest by use of this practice.

Well, Houston Nutt is the biggest perpetrator of over-signing. How's that working for him?

A lot of the over-signing involves kids that don't academically qualify. These kids then end up somewhere else (prep school, JC, etc.) until they become academically eligible. At this point, there's no guarantee they'll end up at the school they originally signed with. In fact, quite a few of them end up elsewhere. IMO this isn't that big an issue but can be avoided if they just don't let kids sign letters of intent until they've qualified academically.

Medical redshirts aren't really the issue. It's medical scholarships. I'm sure it's not limited to Alabama, but Saban gets the most heat for this. A medical scholarship basically allows the team to kick a player off but keep his scholarship. This is a bigger problem as it allows coaches to sign more players every year regardless of their attrition to graduation and the NFL. IMO, schools shouldn't be allowed to kick kids off the teams unless there are academic or behavioral issues. Medical scholarships should still count against your total.

January 15, 2011  12:06 PM ET
QUOTE(#7):

Greyshirting, abuse of medical redshirting is tantamount to warehousing potential starters for your team as natural attrition (matriculation, NFL, injuries, flunkouts, etc.) take place.

I'm not 100% sure but grey-shirting is when a coach asks a freshman to pay his own tuition and then he'll get a scholarship the following year. The student-athlete can decline and accept a scholarship at another school I believe. It's kind of icky but I don't think it's the real problem. If a school was able to enroll the top 5 QB's in the country and 4 of them were willing to pay their own way, then so be it.

Comment #10 has been removed
Comment #11 has been removed
January 15, 2011  12:45 PM ET
QUOTE(#11):

Seems kind of counterintuitive, doesn't it, for a student-athlete seeking an athletic scholarship to have to pay his/her own way at a particular school in the hope of getting on the team's roster at a later date?I find that practice greatly disingenuous on the part of some coaches and their programs. They dangle this proposition to the kids, and the result is that the players are warehoused. It IS icky... akin to a used-car salesman's bait-and-switch tactic on a naive customer.

yep. but the only way to stop it would be to allow schools to only offer the number of scholarships they have available. this wouldn't work at all.

maybe have a draft in reverse. the recruits get ranked and then choose their schools and once a school's scholarships are gone, they get removed from the board...just kidding by the way. no way this would be feasible.

Comment #13 has been removed
January 15, 2011  12:53 PM ET

Exactly...if it ("signing" more than 25) was such a competitive edge, then the other schools would be hollering and screaming...the other conferences would be hollering and screaming...and the conferences and/or NCAA would do something.

I understand that you might "tie up" some kids that way that other schools can't get to them, but in time that would take care of itself. Asking a kid to pay their first year...then, if the kid REALLY wants to play at LUS or Ole Piss, they will pay, if not then they'll go to the next school.

I would say that the coach should indicate upfront that this is a gray-shirt situation so the kid has a chance to go somewhere else easily....

Comment #15 has been removed
January 15, 2011  01:27 PM ET
QUOTE(#15):

That may be part of the problem, D2. Maybe there needs to be more hollering and screaming. I think it has to start from within the SEC itself, with schools like Georgia and Vanderbilt and Florida. If they don't speak out about the inequities of the oversigning/med.scholarship/grayshirting practices, then they have acquiesced to those schemes by their silence.

Well said.....I like the proper use of the word acquiesced....

January 15, 2011  01:33 PM ET
QUOTE(#15):

That may be part of the problem, D2. Maybe there needs to be more hollering and screaming. I think it has to start from within the SEC itself, with schools like Georgia and Vanderbilt and Florida. If they don't speak out about the inequities of the oversigning/med.scholarship/grayshirting practices, then they have acquiesced to those schemes by their silence.

I wonder if they don't complain because they get the players that end up not being academically eligible and who are asked to grey-shirt? Excluding Vanderbilt of course. They can't compete because their athletes have to meet the same academic standards as the rest of their students.

January 15, 2011  01:34 PM ET

Also, not brought up so far but the higher academic standards at some schools could hurt in bringing in some of the DL folks that have academic issues....

January 15, 2011  01:47 PM ET

The SEC could beat up Chuck Norris.

 
January 15, 2011  02:04 PM ET
QUOTE(#18):

Also, not brought up so far but the higher academic standards at some schools could hurt in bringing in some of the DL folks that have academic issues....

That's a good point. I don't know for a fact but I'm pretty sure that the SEC on a whole just meets NCAA requirements. I remember one of the first things Spurrier did at South Carolina was get the school to lower their academic standards for athletes.

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