NCAAF  > General NCAAF  > Sanctions
May 31, 2011, 09:35 PM
After reading all the truth and rumors,all the articles,and all the reader comments about what should happen to the Ohio State football program I have a solution that may well curtail the behavior of the athletes that break rules concerning their eligibility.This is not to excuse the behavior of the administration from the President to the coach.They should be held accountable and to an even higher degree of standards.Most of these kids if not for football or basketball would not even consider going to college if there was no scholarship.That said if caught take the scholarship away.Hang that out there over their heads and it's a different ballgame.Let's start making the athlete accountable for his or her own actions.If something is not done that directly affects the future of these athletes we will be going around in circles when this problem resurfaces.
May 31, 2011  09:39 PM ET

This is my opinion and if the readers disagree lets hear some answers about what to do.At what point do we hold the athlete responsible for his or her own behavior?

May 31, 2011  09:57 PM ET

I'll go further...give the rules/regulations some teeth. I know the lawyers on here will have a field day with this, but make these violations punishable by law, or something, so that the athlete pays.

As Small said, they have the classes but no one pays attention...need to get their attention.

If, as in Bush's case, the violation is after they are in the Pro's, a fine comparable to their salary so that it hurts them...fining someone 200,000 when they make 13m is nothing to them

Comment #3 has been removed
May 31, 2011  11:30 PM ET
QUOTE(#3):

Well, WB, I know that in Texas that even high school athletes are held to a high level of accountability for their voluntary participation in UIL sports. Not only do they have to maintain passing grades in all their classes, but they are now also subject to random drug tests for banned/controlled substances.If that's also the case in NCAA sports, then it looks like it needs considerable tightening up. I agree with you and D2 on this one. Put some teeth into the consequences for a student-athlete's violation of rules. The streets are full of NFL and NBA wannabes. The reason they didn't make it into the pros is because they failed to make the grade in school and failed to follow rules and expectations. In short, they failed themselves. Life is full of hard choices.

Reminds me of when my daughter went to a softball camp at Miss State...on the last day the coaches called the parents onto the field and they talked to the girls...the gist was that, no matter how good you were at your school, there were many that were just as good and wanted to play at MSU. The one's they picked were those that were coachable and willing to work....and do what is right.

Sounds like these standards need to be in place in ALL sports.

June 1, 2011  12:20 AM ET
QUOTE(#4):

Reminds me of when my daughter went to a softball camp at Miss State...on the last day the coaches called the parents onto the field and they talked to the girls...the gist was that, no matter how good you were at your school, there were many that were just as good and wanted to play at MSU. The one's they picked were those that were coachable and willing to work....and do what is right.Sounds like these standards need to be in place in ALL sports.

Makes sense. Would much rather coach a 3 or 4 star hard worker than a 5 star diva.

June 1, 2011  01:04 AM ET
QUOTE(#5):

Makes sense. Would much rather coach a 3 or 4 star hard worker than a 5 star diva.

Seems to work for BSU and TCU.

June 1, 2011  01:09 AM ET
QUOTE(#6):

Seems to work for BSU and TCU.

Concur.

June 1, 2011  01:13 AM ET
QUOTE:

Most of these kids if not for football or basketball would not even consider going to college if there was no scholarship. That said if caught take the scholarship away. Hang that out there over their heads and it's a different ballgame.

Until recently, I think that's always been the case. There's been some leniency for breaking the law (DUI, etc), but those aren't NCAA violations.

June 1, 2011  02:44 AM ET
QUOTE(#8):

Until recently, I think that's always been the case. There's been some leniency for breaking the law (DUI, etc), but those aren't NCAA violations.

True they are university violations and if broken they are grounds for your scholarship to be revoked.A university should have higher and stricter standards than the NCAA and more freedom to police and enforce their own rules.

June 1, 2011  02:55 AM ET
QUOTE(#2):

I'll go further...give the rules/regulations some teeth. I know the lawyers on here will have a field day with this, but make these violations punishable by law, or something, so that the athlete pays.As Small said, they have the classes but no one pays attention...need to get their attention.If, as in Bush's case, the violation is after they are in the Pro's, a fine comparable to their salary so that it hurts them...fining someone 200,000 when they make 13m is nothing to them

I for one and getting tired of hearing the same old excuse about being broke and not having money and I can't call home because my mom has none to send me.Wake up you have everything paid for.You eat the best food on the training table.You can wear football issued gear for clothing all year round.You have none of the out of pocket expenses that the regular student has.Some of them can't call home for money either,but they can't sell the clothes off their backs because they are not athletes.Stop making excuses and man up.You don't like rules or think you have to follow them then go to school on your own and walk on.

June 1, 2011  03:27 AM ET
QUOTE:

That said if caught take the scholarship away. Hang that out there over their heads and it's a different ballgame. Let's start making the athlete accountable for his or her own actions. If something is not done that directly affects the future of these athletes we will be going around in circles when this problem resurfaces.

I think you are right that trying to punish the school into keeping closer tabs on the players is a losing battle.

Yanking scholarships is one idea, and I think that would be a good deterrent for freshman and sophomores--guys who aren't eligible for the draft, and who need the coaching and game experience to reach their potential.

For the upper classmen though, I was noticing that being declared permanently ineligible by the NCAA and sitting out their final season doesn't necessarily hurt on draft day:
Dez Bryant - 1st round
Robert Quinn - 1st round
Marvin Austin - 2nd round
Greg Little - 2nd round

So maybe the NCAA hammers out an agreement with the NFL and the NFL player's association:
Players ruled ineligible by the NCAA cannot be drafted for two years. Players already in the NFL by the time the NCAA makes a ruling cannot play for two years.

Have the player's NFL contract include wording that he declares he was eligible throughout his entire college career. If the NCAA rules he was not, the contract is void and he doesn't get paid.

June 1, 2011  08:57 AM ET
QUOTE(#11):

I think you are right that trying to punish the school into keeping closer tabs on the players is a losing battle. Yanking scholarships is one idea, and I think that would be a good deterrent for freshman and sophomores--guys who aren't eligible for the draft, and who need the coaching and game experience to reach their potential.For the upper classmen though, I was noticing that being declared permanently ineligible by the NCAA and sitting out their final season doesn't necessarily hurt on draft day:Dez Bryant - 1st roundRobert Quinn - 1st roundMarvin Austin - 2nd roundGreg Little - 2nd roundSo maybe the NCAA hammers out an agreement with the NFL and the NFL player's association:Players ruled ineligible by the NCAA cannot be drafted for two years. Players already in the NFL by the time the NCAA makes a ruling cannot play for two years. Have the player's NFL contract include wording that he declares he was eligible throughout his entire college career. If the NCAA rules he was not, the contract is void and he doesn't get paid.

I like it! C'mon Fannation readers sound off!What is your solution?

June 1, 2011  09:59 AM ET
QUOTE(#11):

So maybe the NCAA hammers out an agreement with the NFL and the NFL player's association:Players ruled ineligible by the NCAA cannot be drafted for two years. Players already in the NFL by the time the NCAA makes a ruling cannot play for two years.

Have the player's NFL contract include wording that he declares he was eligible throughout his entire college career. If the NCAA rules he was not, the contract is void and he doesn't get paid.

Hmmm, I really like that, but honestly, I can't see the NFLPA touching that with a ten-foot pole.

Comment #14 has been removed
Comment #15 has been removed
June 1, 2011  10:27 AM ET
QUOTE(#13):

Hmmm, I really like that, but honestly, I can't see the NFLPA touching that with a ten-foot pole.

+1.....$ is what makes the world go round.

June 1, 2011  10:50 AM ET
QUOTE(#14):

A good proposal, UB. I'm not all that versed in corporate law, but wouldn't that be tantamount to collusion (agreement between NCAA & NFL) to deprive a person of earning wages? Or perhaps a kind of monoply being exercised? Just playing devil's advocate here.

I agree it is collusion, but the NFL was granted an anti trust exemption by congress many moons ago. This would just be more collusion on top of the existing collusion.

Also, with what I'm thinking of, the NFLPA would need to be on board. If it's part of the CBA, it might hold up in court.

June 1, 2011  11:03 AM ET
QUOTE(#14):

A good proposal, UB. I'm not all that versed in corporate law, but wouldn't that be tantamount to collusion (agreement between NCAA & NFL) to deprive a person of earning wages? Or perhaps a kind of monoply being exercised? Just playing devil's advocate here.

I'm not a lawyer either, so this is just guesswork. PGH Buckeye was the FN member to go to on these types of things...

I read that Tressel's contract had a clause that he could be fired for failing to report NCAA violations. So I was thinking the NFL player would have similar wording that he could be terminated for having committed NCAA violations.

June 1, 2011  11:25 AM ET

Fire Smith & Gee. Release/dismiss the offending student ahtletes. Give Luke Fickell every opportunity to rebuild a "clean" program. Find and hire a pres & AD who will support "clean" athletics, even to kicking out elite athletes who commit egregious violations. Ban boosters who violate the rules. Strip them of tickets, et al. Get court issued restraining orders keeping them off campus and at least 1000 yards from any tOSU employee or student. Go nekkid-in-the-spotlight public about every little thing. Become so proactive that NCAA reps feel unclean and wash their hands raw when they visit.

 
June 1, 2011  11:26 AM ET

Oogiest (daughter's word) program, tOSU or Colorado?
Chat amongst yourselves...

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