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  • 01/24/2012, 10:41AM ET

Joe paterno, will he be remembered more for the scandal or football..

HighwayCrossingFrog (175-852-64) vs Mr. Jolly (38-13-8)
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paterno will go down in history more for the football..

I love the guy, and I miss him already..

I know the scandal was bad..
And its still fresh in peoples minds..

But paterno accomplished things most people can only dream of..
he always had a pleasant demeanour..
and inspired thousands of college kids to be great men..

Time heals most wounds..
people in time will forgive paterno..
he was not a hitler or a manson..
he was somwone that made a tragic error..
he was not like one of the catholic priests..
his last 2 months on earth were filled with regret..
that should be sufficient punishment..

People who still point the finger, need to let it go..

Sunday was a sad day, we lost a true leader..
it was cute that he died on one of footballs biggest days..
it was what he wanted.. Some things are meant to be..

Rip paterno..
the people who will remember you badly are punks,
WHILE YOU WILL ALWAYS BE A LEGEND!!!!


First, let me direct you all to Comment #3 from my friend and PSU fan, Grue. It's a strong comment from a fan base that I'm sure has found difficulty making a path thru 2011.

As for the TD, it's my belief that the scandal has forever changed Paterno's legacy.

Considering the size/scope of that legacy being largely based on football prior to the scandal, it has to be noted the magnitude that a scandal would have to be to even put this to debate.

While I choose to remember Paterno for the positives that he brought forward with his life (far too many to list in 1200 characters), there is no way that his story will be brought forward in the future without the shadow of how it ended.

History, often, remembers somebody's faults/mistakes/failures more than their achievements, especially if the shock value is higher than we're accustomed to.

While Paterno is by far not the only individual involved in this scandal, it was his accomplishments that made him the face of PSU football. The price for that is that you're also the face of it thru good/bad, regardless of your role played in it.

Time will soften the shock of the scandal, but it won't subtract its part of the story.


"we live in a world, where everyone steals.."

Bush..

Jesus christ, one of the most brilliant humans died on the cross..
meanwhile oj simpson lives a life we can only dream of..

Joe was senile..
if your grandpa made a tragic error.. It happens..

Born in sin come on in..

I am a sinner..
I forgive joe..
can you?


When the PSU scandal broke, there were many times where I found myself having to explain to people who Joe Paterno was.

That came to mind while pondering this 2nd argument and I want to explore it.

NCAAF is largely an American interest, so we'll stick with the US.

There are currently 313 million people in this country.

We'll subtract 63 million who are 14 years and under, giving us 250 million.

I think it's generous to say that a third of that gives any serious attention to NCAAF (83 million).

That leaves us with about 167 million people.

Out of that group, one can only guess how many people learned of who Joe Paterno was thru watching the fallout of the PSU scandal, but I promise you it was more than it would've been only 15 years ago.

Why?

* Internet
* 24 Hour News Stations
* Twitter

Now add a portion of the 63 million who are 14 and under who will not have the luxury of enjoying Paterno's legend prior to the knowledge of the scandal. Not to mention anybody born from that point and into the future.

Not to mention that this scandal isn't going anywhere soon. We still haven't concluded Sandusky's fate.

In this case, any press is bad.


While I do think Penn state should fry..

Patterno is senile..
He was good at a couple of things, like football..
Senile people are good at a couple of things in the past..

Pattern got fired, public humiliation and had a rough death bed..

It's time..
Time to move on..
You are crucifying the wrong guy..

A priest once told me,
That wheneveryone dies, they all go to heaven..

Time to move on folks..

You put pattern on the burner..
Then put me too..

It was a horrible tragic error..

"I want my Fu-c--king life back"
Memento..


There have been several cases where a notable person has been able to escape the stigma of negative actions or connections after a significant amount of time has gone by.

In Paterno's case, this will be more difficult because so many of the facets of his legacy will be difficult to discuss without eventually running into the scandal.

Aside from all the victories and national titles, much of Paterno's legacy was built off of his accomplishments outside of the football field. It's in these areas where the shadow of the scandal will continue to breathe in the future.

For example:

* Paterno coached the "right" way by graduating his players and emphasizing life lessons thru continued support and by example.

It will be impossible to discuss this now without bringing up the fact that when faced with a radically disturbing situation that had the ability to shake up his school's foundation, many will continue to believe he failed.

Many will simply view it as: when faced with a situation that pit his school/friends' reputation versus the well being of others, he failed to make the right or "moral" decision.

Doesn't matter if that view is right, just that is exists.

Comment #1 has been removed
Comment #2 has been removed
January 24, 2012  11:20 AM ET
QUOTE(#1):

This is a tribute..we have all made mistakes, and done stuff we wish we could go back in time and redo..

The people whose lives he impacted will remember the "legend." Everyone else, that sits on their throne of moral superiority isolated from Paterno's level of leadership and unimaginable responsibility, will remember the Sandusky scandal first. Paterno made mistakes in how he handled this. But it is a drop in the bucket compared to the overwhelming good he did.

Unfortunately, the latter far outnumber the former. So Frog, it doesn't look good. I know Jolly can make a great counter argument. But I appreciate the nice tribute.


In a way, I think Paterno would prefer to be remembered as a fallible man who helped a lot of kids. The ending is almost poetic. Achilles had his heel so he would be remembered as a mortal hero and not a god. Paterno never wanted the parades. He didn't want the stadium bearing his name. He didn't want the talk of records for himself - he wanted the records to generate interest for the athletes and school.

Had this scandal not happened, Paterno would have been painted as larger than life by PSU alums and the media. But he wasn't. He didn't want that, either. He was fallible. He was a man with difficult choices and heavy responsibilities. He made mistakes in handling some situations. He succeeded in handling many more. He won football games with great coaching, he lost football games with predictable/boring teams.

All things happen for a reason. Sandusky happened for a reason. Curley acted (or didn't act) for a reason. Paterno was raised to godlike status and brought back down to human fallibility. Attention was brought to the victims, awareness raised.

Achilles fell after Troy. We remember him for his heel and not as a god-like warrior. Maybe it is better that way, to be reminded we're all human.

January 24, 2012  11:26 AM ET
QUOTE(#3):

The people whose lives he impacted will remember the "legend." Everyone else, that sits on their throne of moral superiority isolated from Paterno's level of leadership and unimaginable responsibility, will remember the Sandusky scandal first. Paterno made mistakes in how he handled this. But it is a drop in the bucket compared to the overwhelming good he did.Unfortunately, the latter far outnumber the former. So Frog, it doesn't look good. I know Jolly can make a great counter argument. But I appreciate the nice tribute.In a way, I think Paterno would prefer to be remembered as a fallible man who helped a lot of kids. The ending is almost poetic. Achilles had his heel so he would be remembered as a mortal hero and not a god. Paterno never wanted the parades. He didn't want the stadium bearing his name. He didn't want the talk of records for himself - he wanted the records to generate interest for the athletes and school. Had this scandal not happened, Paterno would have been painted as larger than life by PSU alums and the media. But he wasn't. He didn't want that, either. He was fallible. He was a man with difficult choices and heavy responsibilities. He made mistakes in handling some situations. He succeeded in handling many more. He won football games with great coaching, he lost football games with predictable/boring teams.All things happen for a reason. Sandusky happened for a reason. Curley acted (or didn't act) for a reason. Paterno was raised to godlike status and brought back down to human fallibility. Attention was brought to the victims, awareness raised.Achilles fell after Troy. We remember him for his heel and not as a god-like warrior. Maybe it is better that way, to be reminded we're all human.

All I remember was Orlando Bloom taking down the great Achilles.

Rest in peace Joe Paterno.

January 24, 2012  11:49 AM ET

Joe who?

Comment #6 has been removed
January 24, 2012  12:09 PM ET
QUOTE(#3):

The people whose lives he impacted will remember the "legend." Everyone else, that sits on their throne of moral superiority isolated from Paterno's level of leadership and unimaginable responsibility, will remember the Sandusky scandal first. Paterno made mistakes in how he handled this. But it is a drop in the bucket compared to the overwhelming good he did.Unfortunately, the latter far outnumber the former. So Frog, it doesn't look good. I know Jolly can make a great counter argument. But I appreciate the nice tribute.In a way, I think Paterno would prefer to be remembered as a fallible man who helped a lot of kids. The ending is almost poetic. Achilles had his heel so he would be remembered as a mortal hero and not a god. Paterno never wanted the parades. He didn't want the stadium bearing his name. He didn't want the talk of records for himself - he wanted the records to generate interest for the athletes and school. Had this scandal not happened, Paterno would have been painted as larger than life by PSU alums and the media. But he wasn't. He didn't want that, either. He was fallible. He was a man with difficult choices and heavy responsibilities. He made mistakes in handling some situations. He succeeded in handling many more. He won football games with great coaching, he lost football games with predictable/boring teams.All things happen for a reason. Sandusky happened for a reason. Curley acted (or didn't act) for a reason. Paterno was raised to godlike status and brought back down to human fallibility. Attention was brought to the victims, awareness raised.Achilles fell after Troy. We remember him for his heel and not as a god-like warrior. Maybe it is better that way, to be reminded we're all human.

what are you smoking? Paterno finds out that a buddy is raping children and he calls the head of campus police to cover it up....Paterno might as well have personally held down every boy that Sandusky raped from that point on...Paterno was the friggin godfather on that campus and if wanted something done, nothing in the world could have stopped it....and if he wanted something ignored, it would go away for a decade, obviously....people want to call this a single failure on the part of Paterno but that isn't the case....EVERY day since that day he failed to do something is another moral failure....that's a MINIMUM of 3,562 moral failures in the last decade....not even George W Bush could compete with that level of immorality....the ONLY thing that mattered here was the kids...not the rule of law, not cronyism, not conspiracy, not protecting the school, not the football program....and those kids were the ONLY thing he DIDN'T take steps to protect....if there was a hell, Paterno would be checking out his new home right now...I hope his death was a painful one but it was too quick....

Comment #8 has been removed
January 24, 2012  12:11 PM ET

and anyone that defends Paterno should follow him to that hell....

January 24, 2012  12:16 PM ET

Paterno's deal with the devil expired and he was sucked down to hell...

Comment #11 has been removed
January 24, 2012  12:22 PM ET

Paterno didn't catch crap because he was the face of PSU, he caught crap because he was DIRECTLY involved. He had knowledge and the power to do something about it and CHOSE not to....all he had to do was dial 9-1-1 and anonymously communicate that Sandusky was witnessed raping a child...he didn't have to say he saw something, he didn't have to say who he was....all he had to do was bring it to the attention of the REAL authorities rather than the fake cops that serve the school's interests. He didn't need to provide evidence...just the accusation would have been enough to start an investigation...the investigation would have been enough to have Sandusky removed from being around children...the end result would have been that Sandusky wouldn't have had an easy time finding victims or a place to rape them without access to the kids charity and the campus....

Comment #13 has been removed
January 24, 2012  12:24 PM ET

conspiracy....he IS just as guilty....to tell only people that have the power to cover something up and not tell anyone that could actually DO something about it means he conspired with the campus police and the AD to cover it up in order to protect the school and his precious football program...

January 24, 2012  12:25 PM ET
QUOTE(#11):

You act as if Paterno was the one doing the raping. Sure, he could have done more to ensure that the Sandusky thing was handled properly and followed up with authorities to check the status of the investigation. Of course he could.He has since called it the single biggest regret in his entire life.The guy had his hand in PSU football for like 60 years. One bad mistake shouldn't overshadow years and years and years of good things that he has done for the school and the community.

you avatar would be more accurate if the toilet was exploding and spewing $h!t everywhere....

January 24, 2012  12:27 PM ET

Loki = Sandusky

Comment #17 has been removed
January 24, 2012  12:27 PM ET

it would have been only one mistake if he only had a moment to do anything and missed his chance....but he had everyday from the moment he was notified....he could have called the police any day out of the last 10 years....that last 10 years of his life was constant moral failure

Comment #19 has been removed
 
January 24, 2012  12:27 PM ET
QUOTE(#17):

You want to borrow it?

it wouldn't fit me....

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