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  • 04/10/2012, 11:22PM ET

If steroids and HGH are banned by MLB, then Toradol should be as well.

Marlins Fan (156-78-31) vs DJRoxalot (1085-669-126)
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First off, I'd like to give credit where it's due... this TD was inspired by an article I read on nbcsports.com, and without that article I wouldn't have been able to make this TD due to a lack of information. So thanks, nbcsports.com.

Anyway, MLB has a ban on performance enhancing drugs. We all know that.

However, I bet you didn't know that there's a PED which MLB hasn't banned. This particular PED is known as Toradol.

Toradol is a powerful anti-inflammatory medication which users receive via an injection in their buttocks. Long term effects of regular use are unknown, but we do know that it has been linked to organ damage and produces a feeling of euphoria.

The benefits of Toradol include the ability to block out soreness, fatigue, pain and the effects of injury.

It allows MLB players to play when their bodies would not allow that same thing, naturally. Through drugs, players are able to ignore their injuries and get back on the field much more quickly.

Sounds similar to HGH, IMO. I know they work differently, but the results are the same. Using drugs to disregard serious injury.

And it's like steroids in that long term effects are unknown.


Not a huge MLB fan, but I won't be arguing it as a straight up baseball TD.

Ketorolac (more commonly known as Toradol) is used to relieve moderately severe pain, usually after surgery. Ketorolac is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. It works by stopping the body's production of a substance that causes pain, fever, and inflammation.

So, it's a painkiller, right? It's up to a player if they want use painkillers to get back on the field imo. I think that should be allowed. A lot of these guys get these insane contracts (Jason Werth is a great example) after playing well for a relatively short amount of time. So, shouldn't we encourage players earning their contracts?

It is not a performance enhancing drug (like steroids) that actually can improve a players performance on the field.

Ketorolac is used for the short-term relief of moderately severe pain and should not be used for longer than 5 days, for mild pain, or for pain from chronic (long-term) conditions. So, it's not a long term solution.

I took this primarily so it wouldn't become another zombie TD. Good luck, Marlins Fan.


Yep; it's a pain killer. But let's not act like it's a drug players use for 5 days only.

To wit, Johan Santana had shoulder surgery WAY back in September, 2010. He missed the entire 2011 season but pitched Opening Day, 2012. Santana said he received an injection of Toradol in his **** in order to stay on schedule for his Opening Day start.

Considering we're talking about the aftermath of a 2010 surgery, it's not much of a leap to expect that Santana will receive another dosage of Toradol prior to his second start. And this third. And his fourth... etc.

It's a continuing ordeal. And since one of the known side effects is a feeling of euphoria (just like Percocet, Vicodin, Oxycontin, etc) there is more than a small chance that Santana will either become addicted to the drug or will just keep using it long-term in an effort to battle his pain. Maybe he'll use it for both reasons, I don't know.

Without Toradol Santana would not have felt healthy enough to pitch.

I don't see how this scenario is any different than when Andy Pettite took HGH back in 2002 in an attempt to quickly recover from an elbow injury.

But Andy was breaking MLB's PED rules, Santana isn't.


"Yep; it's a pain killer. But let's not act like it's a drug players use for 5 days only."

That's up to the player. Just, like it is in football. Brett Favre took painkillers. Is it okay for football platers and not MLB players?

"Santana said he received an injection of Toradol in his **** in order to stay on schedule for his Opening Day start."

Rather than sit and collect a paycheck while not earning it. And it's legal. I know you think it shouldn't be, but it is. And I think players should be given props for willing to play despite being in pain. Too many players find any excuse not to play and still collect that paycheck.

Santana is not an everyday player. He pitches every 5th day and will make somewhere between 32-35 starts this season. There also is no guarantee he will be in need of it before every start this season. That is you making an assumption.

Santana wanted to be able to pitch after missing all of last season. That should be applauded, not criticized.


Your Favre analogy is inherently flawed. It wasn't right for Favre to dig through his own refuse in the bowels of his toilet bowl trying to find a Percocet either. Favre's pain killer addiction was a major problem in his life, so using that as an excuse for MLB players becoming addicted to pain killers is, well, silly. At best.

Whether or not Toradol is legal ddoesn't have any bearing on this topic. The TD is about whether or not it should be legal. Just saying "it's legal" proves nothing.

Yes, Santana is a starting pitcher. Yes, he pitches every fifth day. So? Again, what does that have to do with the debate?

The point I made is that since it's been nearly two years and he just took a Toradol injection, it's foolish to assume he won't take more. It's been TWO YEARS and he's STILL taking pain meds in an effort to feel good enough to pitch. This is how addicts are created, my friend.

Also, I'm not criticizing Johan. I'm saying if PEDs (steroids, HGH) are banned because they can help you feel better more quickly than your body would NORMALLY allow, then pain killing injections should be banned too, because they accomplish the same thing.

Or maybe..


"Also, I'm not criticizing Johan. I'm saying if PED's (steroids, HGH) are banned because they can help you feel better more quickly than your body would normally allow, then pain killing injections should be banned too, because they accomplish the same thing."

Where does the madness end, Marlins? Ban Tylenol? Ban Aleve? Ban all pain relievers? They help you get on the field faster than NORMAL.

LOL. That would be insane.

Your also leaving out a certain aspect of many PED's. They make you better at sports in addition to helping you heal quicker. They make you stronger and help your performance as well.

Nobody would deny that. Barry Bonds slugged more homers because he could hit the ball farther. He wasn't taking them to get healthy and to return to action quicker. He wanted a definite advantage on the field.

Pain killers help you return to action quicker. They don't necessarily make you a better player. And like I said, once you ban pain killers, that opens a Pandora's Box. You would have to ban over the counter medications like I said earlier.

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April 10, 2012  11:44 PM ET
QUOTE(#2):

Never, EVER, let them see you sweat!

Then I guess a sauna is out of the question...

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April 10, 2012  11:49 PM ET
QUOTE(#7):

How's the sabbatical going?

It's a working sabbatical. Very rare.

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April 11, 2012  12:06 AM ET

I don't know enough about this particular drug but if it's just another pain reliever/anti-inflammatory I fail to see a connection to performance enhancement. So if this should be banned, then shouldn't the same apply to hundreds of similar drugs that effectively do the same thing and are prescribed after any moderate orthopedic injury?

I think you may have jumped the shark on this one MF. Taking something to manage pain and aid recovery from injury that has no link to actual performance enhancement seems like common sense to me. These kind of drugs are taken by athletes on a regular basis. Are you suggesting nobody should play until they are 100% healthy, or that they should play through pain without aid of anything stronger than an aspirin?

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April 11, 2012  12:18 AM ET

intersting...why?...is it news....hmmmm..no

April 11, 2012  12:21 AM ET
QUOTE(#14):

I don't know enough about this particular drug but if it's just another pain reliever/anti-inflammatory I fail to see a connection to performance enhancement. So if this should be banned, then shouldn't the same apply to hundreds of similar drugs that effectively do the same thing and are prescribed after any moderate orthopedic injury? I think you may have jumped the shark on this one MF. Taking something to manage pain and aid recovery from injury that has no link to actual performance enhancement seems like common sense to me. These kind of drugs are taken by athletes on a regular basis. Are you suggesting nobody should play until they are 100% healthy, or that they should play through pain without aid of anything stronger than an aspirin?

terry bradshaw would agree

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April 11, 2012  12:22 AM ET
QUOTE(#15):

I see where MF is heading with this. Baseball players can push their bodies further after getting this shot than they would normally be able to do, thus making it a performance enhancing drug.

That argument could be made to a certain extent re:any pain medication, including tylenol.

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