Truth & Rumors > MLB

Nishioka a major mistake in Minnesota

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08:18 AM ET 09.02 | Tsuyoshi Nishioka has yet to deliver as advertised since arriving from Japan. [Nishioka] was a heralded shortstop for the Chiba Lotte Marines. He was a batting champion, Gold Glove winner and leader of a team that had just won the Japan Series. And, at age 26, his best years seemed to be ahead of him. The Twins believed he was the perfect player to help them achieve goal of becoming a championship contender. With one month left in Nishioka's first season in the majors, it looks as if the Twins made a major mistake. The club spent $5.3 million in a posting fee and $3 million in salary this season, only to find out the hole at short is as big as it has been in decades.

Star Tribune

Joe Mauer, Getty Images Joe Mauer, Getty Images
September 2, 2011  08:24 AM ET

They throw different in Japan don't they?

September 2, 2011  08:25 AM ET
QUOTE(#1):

They throw different in Japan don't they?

Comes in slanted from the side towards homeplate or something like that.

September 2, 2011  08:26 AM ET

It's not like it's his fault solely the Twins are bad this year.

September 2, 2011  08:42 AM ET

A Japanese player not being as advertised? Not like that's never happened.

September 2, 2011  08:44 AM ET
QUOTE(#4):

A Japanese player not being as advertised? Not like that's never happened.

I'm a big fan of Japanese baseball, but it is indeed a totally different game. Scouts and GM's just don't see that I guess.

September 2, 2011  08:46 AM ET
QUOTE(#5):

I'm a big fan of Japanese baseball, but it is indeed a totally different game. Scouts and GM's just don't see that I guess.

I could tell you were a big fan based on post #2. Furthermore, you don't take into account the Japanese success stories in MLB like Ichiro Suzuki and Kideki Matsui.

September 2, 2011  08:52 AM ET

Sidearm and Quiz-style "underhand" are way popular in Japan, and they love breaking balls. But, still...give the guy a break, he may just need time to adjust. Grandy didn't seem like such a great signing for the Yanks last season...

September 2, 2011  08:53 AM ET
QUOTE(#6):

I could tell you were a big fan based on post #2. Furthermore, you don't take into account the Japanese success stories in MLB like Ichiro Suzuki and Kideki Matsui.

There were alot of success story by my standards, I consider Daisuke Matsuzaka a success with the REDSOX, at least early on, and let's not forget Nomo, but alot of the players couldn't adapt to the Big Ball theory of the Managers of today. I think it had to be a special situation for certains Japanese players to succeed over here. One of my fav's was Suzuki with the A's, but he went back home.

September 2, 2011  08:55 AM ET
QUOTE(#8):

There were alot of success story by my standards, I consider Daisuke Matsuzaka a success with the REDSOX, at least early on, and let's not forget Nomo, but alot of the players couldn't adapt to the Big Ball theory of the Managers of today. I think it had to be a special situation for certains Japanese players to succeed over here. One of my fav's was Suzuki with the A's, but he went back home.

Tadahito Iguchi was an integral part of the 2005 champion White Sox also.

September 2, 2011  08:56 AM ET
QUOTE(#7):

Sidearm and Quiz-style "underhand" are way popular in Japan, and they love breaking balls. But, still...give the guy a break, he may just need time to adjust. Grandy didn't seem like such a great signing for the Yanks last season...

Sidearm and Breaking Balls BIG TIME. The fastball is an afterthought with most of their pitchers which doesn't lead to much success for their pictures, except for Nomo which had a wild delivery.

Comment #11 has been removed
September 2, 2011  08:58 AM ET
QUOTE(#3):

It's not like it's his fault solely the Twins are bad this year.

True...Mauer and Morneau both hurt...relatively weak rotation...etc.

September 2, 2011  08:58 AM ET
QUOTE(#9):

Tadahito Iguchi was an integral part of the 2005 champion White Sox also.

There are success stories, but compared to the Latin influx, the Japanese one didn't make as big a splash. Now position players have the upper hand because of the different style of play with the pitchers, but I believe that Japanese ball is changing over the course of these years to be more like US baseball. Only time will tell.

September 2, 2011  08:58 AM ET
QUOTE(#11):

They do the after three swings and misses the coaches come out and put the ball on a tee right?

LMAO.

Comment #15 has been removed
September 2, 2011  09:05 AM ET
QUOTE(#15):

Nomo Garciaparra was American.

this a joke? his name was Nomar. Nomo is a different person.

September 2, 2011  09:06 AM ET
QUOTE(#13):

There are success stories, but compared to the Latin influx, the Japanese one didn't make as big a splash. Now position players have the upper hand because of the different style of play with the pitchers, but I believe that Japanese ball is changing over the course of these years to be more like US baseball. Only time will tell.

I think a bigger case is made of Japanese transition failures compared to say Latino ones because of the relative rarity of Japanese players in comparison still.

September 2, 2011  09:07 AM ET

lol

Comment #19 has been removed
 
September 2, 2011  09:10 AM ET
QUOTE(#19):

Depends, is Adam Dunn considered a joke?

don't sidestep the question

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