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No restrictions* on Strasburg's innings

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07:57 AM ET 01.15 | Consider Washington optimistic, but not imprudent. The Nationals would like to see Stephen Strasburg pitch 200 innings next season following a year in which Washington's ace was shut down at just under 160 and missed the postseason. In an interview with USA TODAY Sports, Bob Boone, the Nationals' vice president of player development, was asked to elaborate on manager Davey Johnson's comment in December that he has "no restrictions" for next season. "To say there's no restrictions really means, 'Hey, we'd like him to pitch 200 innings,' " Boone said. "But, you're not gonna say no restrictions like you might have on Steve Carlton, who would throw 320 innings. You're not gonna do that. There's always restrictions, but the meaning is, 'We're not gonna shut him down after 160 innings.'"

USA TODAY Sports

Stephen Strasburg, Getty Images Stephen Strasburg, Getty Images
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January 15, 2013  08:25 AM ET

What goes up must come down
spinning wheel got to go round
Talking about your troubles it's a crying sin
Ride a painted pony
Let the spinning wheel spin

You got no money, and you, you got no home
Spinning wheel, spinning all alone
Talking about your troubles and you, you never learn
Ride a painted pony
let the spinning wheel turn

Comment #5 has been removed
January 15, 2013  08:48 AM ET

Cy Young for Strasburg next year.

January 15, 2013  09:02 AM ET

Carlton had 12 seasons where he pitched more than 250 innings.

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January 15, 2013  09:18 AM ET
QUOTE(#6):

Cy Young for Strasburg next year.

Kershaw.

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January 15, 2013  09:34 AM ET

Carlton always wanted to retire as the lefthander with the most career wins, but in his last few years as he bounced around from team to team he finally had to face reality and he called it quits in 1988 as a Minestoa Twin second to Warren Spahn.
If you leave off his last three years he would have had a w/l pct of exactly .600. Which means he would have averaged a 15-10 w/l record per year and remember he played for half his career on a very bad Phillies team.
Most teams would kill for a guy who could promise you minimum of 15 wins a year.

January 15, 2013  09:36 AM ET

The 160 limit was stupid. Where is 160 defined as the standard for recovering pitchers? It's not. It's just some arbitrary number the coaches decided on before the season. Ignore the fact that he felt fine, and most importantly, THE TEAM NEEDED HIM. I would have fired the manager for being so short sighted on this issue. If you were gonna stick to 160, then they should have skipped a couple starts here and there or pulled him after 5 innings on his starts, so that he would still have innings available to pitch in the postseason. Why they rode him hard all regular season, only to completely shut him down in the postseason baffles me.

January 15, 2013  09:43 AM ET
QUOTE(#9):

Kershaw.

Interesting avatar, Slinky. Did you lose a bet?

January 15, 2013  09:45 AM ET

Just googled who were the best lefthanded pitchers in MLB history and here are the top six of one sites top ten list:
Lefty Grove (never saw him pitch so I have no idea but he was dominant in his time);
The rest I either saw (at least on TV or was very aware of)
Warren Spahn;
Randy Johnson (not the most pleasant personality in the game but they don't get paid to be nice; he had times when he was unbeatable)
Sandy Koufax (had about a six year span where was dominant)
Whitey Ford (real good but in my opinion if Carlton played for a team like the 1950 Yankees he might of won twenty games every year)
and
Steve Carlton

January 15, 2013  09:49 AM ET
QUOTE(#13):

The 160 limit was stupid. Where is 160 defined as the standard for recovering pitchers? It's not. It's just some arbitrary number the coaches decided on before the season. Ignore the fact that he felt fine, and most importantly, THE TEAM NEEDED HIM. I would have fired the manager for being so short sighted on this issue. If you were gonna stick to 160, then they should have skipped a couple starts here and there or pulled him after 5 innings on his starts, so that he would still have innings available to pitch in the postseason. Why they rode him hard all regular season, only to completely shut him down in the postseason baffles me.

I agree they should have skipped a start or two so he would be available later in the season. Very poor management if you are gonna limit his innings and is that good.
Wonder if he has ever met Tom House who works with pitchers on their delivery motions and has written many books on the subject.
He once worked with Nolan Ryan.

January 15, 2013  09:50 AM ET
QUOTE(#9):

Kershaw.

Kershaw is always in the conversation in my opinion.

January 15, 2013  09:55 AM ET

Anyone else think Strasberg could be a candiadte to fail the new in season testing program for HgH?

January 15, 2013  10:01 AM ET
QUOTE(#9):

Kershaw.

Josh Beckette.

 
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