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Report: NCAA backs out of Miami settlement talks

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07:12 AM ET 02.22 | As if the NCAA hasn't done enough already to aggravate Miami, add this to the list: Last week, UM and the NCAA engaged in serious settlement talks, and several UM people expected a deal because president Mark Emmert seemed initially supportive. UM wanted a settlement and likely would have accepted modest scholarship reductions. But a source said the NCAA then informed UM there would be no deal and suggested to UM the enforcement staff and two key boards were against it because of concerns about "not deviating from the rules." Also, UM tried to convince the NCAA to not use the words "lack of institutional control" -- and was hopeful at one point it might be changed to the less serious "failure to monitor" -- but the NCAA wouldn't back down.

Miami Herald

Mark Emmert, Joe Robbins/Getty Images Mark Emmert, Joe Robbins/Getty Images
February 22, 2013  07:36 AM ET

Emmert senses more time in the lights.

February 22, 2013  08:28 AM ET

Miami is as guilty as Alabama was when they got about 27 lost scholarships. I expect Miami to get no less than that.

February 22, 2013  08:35 AM ET

The easy thing for the NCAA to do would be to settle the Miami investigation quickly and quietly. The fact that they are persuing the matter indicates that, in spite of the blunders of now former members of the enforcement staff, there is enough properly acquired evidence to hit Miami with Lack of Instituional Control. As this is one of the most serious charges that can be made against a school, it stands to reason that if found guilty by the COI, Miami will be facing probation, monitoring, bowl bans and scholarship losses.

February 22, 2013  08:54 AM ET
QUOTE(#3):

he fact that they are persuing the matter indicates that, in spite of the blunders of now former members of the enforcement staff, there is enough properly acquired evidence to hit Miami with Lack of Instituional Control.

I do hope that you are right about the NCAA's motivation. The dismissal of Julie Roe Lach has a whiff of sacrificial lamb to it. With Emmert stepping to the fore in speaking to the press about this care, and in light of his apparent directed actions against PSU, I am leery of the future course of action and the implications for NCAA's enforcement arm.

February 22, 2013  08:56 AM ET

C'mon Shalala, don't be a wus about this. Go for the jugular.

February 22, 2013  08:57 AM ET

OR in an effort to make themselves look better they are refusing to llok at the fact that they screwed up the investigation. They themselves had a "Lack of Institutional Control" and could not use information that they aquired by breaking their own rules. In this case they are not above the law (or bylaws as written by the NCAA) and therefore need to realize that they could only scold UM for what actually they have evidence for. I expect UM to bring in the BIG DAWGS and to eventually take this to a court of law that will enlighten the NCAA of their stupidity.

February 22, 2013  09:03 AM ET
QUOTE(#4):

I do hope that you are right about the NCAA's motivation. The dismissal of Julie Roe Lach has a whiff of sacrificial lamb to it. With Emmert stepping to the fore in speaking to the press about this care, and in light of his apparent directed actions against PSU, I am leery of the future course of action and the implications for NCAA's enforcement arm.

Mornin', TM, DS, JK. With the recent mud on the NCAA's face via PSU and now Miami, I have to think that the Association is in serious damage-control mode now. Their credibility has been called into question like never before, and legal challenges to NCAA authority over collage sports is going to be new norm, IMO.

I'm thinking this behavior is a by-product of the tsunami of conference realignment waves and the push for the big-ticket superconferences. The NCAA is, I think, rapidly becoming irrelevant.

February 22, 2013  09:05 AM ET
QUOTE(#6):

OR in an effort to make themselves look better they are refusing to llok at the fact that they screwed up the investigation. They themselves had a "Lack of Institutional Control" and could not use information that they aquired by breaking their own rules. In this case they are not above the law (or bylaws as written by the NCAA) and therefore need to realize that they could only scold UM for what actually they have evidence for. I expect UM to bring in the BIG DAWGS and to eventually take this to a court of law that will enlighten the NCAA of their stupidity.

Agreed. Nice opening comment. And welcome. I'd have to call your thought a "Ninja'd."

February 22, 2013  09:09 AM ET
QUOTE(#3):

The easy thing for the NCAA to do would be to settle the Miami investigation quickly and quietly. The fact that they are persuing the matter indicates that, in spite of the blunders of now former members of the enforcement staff, there is enough properly acquired evidence to hit Miami with Lack of Instituional Control. As this is one of the most serious charges that can be made against a school, it stands to reason that if found guilty by the COI, Miami will be facing probation, monitoring, bowl bans and scholarship losses.

DS, you know better than to think that the NCAA will settle, "any investigation quickly and quietly"!!!! :-)

February 22, 2013  09:10 AM ET
QUOTE(#3):

The fact that they are persuing the matter indicates that, in spite of the blunders of now former members of the enforcement staff, there is enough properly acquired evidence to hit Miami with Lack of Instituional Control

You're being far too generous to those whine-heads at the NCAA. The reason that they are insisting on this is that, in light of the revelations regarding their own investigation tactics, they have decided to make a power play. They think that they will look weak and, therefore, lose power in their relationships with the member schools, if they back away from their original assertion. These people are cold-blooded and they see themselves in a power struggle. They are not, in the slightest, concerned about athletes. They are concerned with their own financial and power positions. The NCAA should be dismantled. Shalala, as much as I dislike her politically, should mount a full-blown legal / political attack. Former college athletes with the financial wherewithal to do so, should support that effort for the good of the sport and for the current athletes who are little more than serfs in this system.

February 22, 2013  09:16 AM ET
QUOTE(#5):

C'mon Shalala, don't be a wus about this. Go for the jugular.

IMO, it would be better if Shalala were to keep her mouth shut, as it could really open a can of worms for Miami!!!

February 22, 2013  09:16 AM ET

"... two key boards were against it because of concerns about "not deviating from the rules."
Didn't stop you with Penn State. What changed?

February 22, 2013  09:20 AM ET
QUOTE(#6):

OR in an effort to make themselves look better they are refusing to llok at the fact that they screwed up the investigation. They themselves had a "Lack of Institutional Control" and could not use information that they aquired by breaking their own rules. In this case they are not above the law (or bylaws as written by the NCAA) and therefore need to realize that they could only scold UM for what actually they have evidence for. I expect UM to bring in the BIG DAWGS and to eventually take this to a court of law that will enlighten the NCAA of their stupidity.

If Shalala and Miami were to take this case to court, would it open up a can of worms for previous cases, like USC, Ohio State and Penn State???

February 22, 2013  09:21 AM ET

There is so much more to the NCAA than CFB and related rules enforcement. It would be a pity if current executive leadership and CFB-related actions seriously harmed an organization which can do good in promoting collegiate athletics.

February 22, 2013  09:34 AM ET
QUOTE(#14):

There is so much more to the NCAA than CFB and related rules enforcement. It would be a pity if current executive leadership and CFB-related actions seriously harmed an organization which can do good in promoting collegiate athletics.

Agreed. The NCAA's raison d'etre was origionally to keep the game of football safe. But over the decades since its formation, mission creep has made into a huge enforcement and political arm of collegiate athletics. Yet it has only been moderately successful in reining in feral athletic departments who flaunt the rules.

At the same time, the Association has garnered a reputation for tyrannical judgements and uneven enforcement of its bylaws. It's got a huge public relations problem on its hands. Loss of credibility is like blood in the water. How does the NCAA clean up its act and remain relevant?

February 22, 2013  09:39 AM ET
QUOTE(#15):

How does the NCAA clean up its act and remain relevant?

Seemingly, it would be easier to rid NYC of rats or the Southeast of feral pigs. Still, an enlightened leadership with conscientious new blood on staff could remake the NCAA into what it can be - a fair and impartial promoter of collegiate athletics.

February 22, 2013  09:45 AM ET

Guilty, UM. Suffer the consequences.

February 22, 2013  09:54 AM ET
QUOTE(#16):

Seemingly, it would be easier to rid NYC of rats or the Southeast of feral pigs. Still, an enlightened leadership with conscientious new blood on staff could remake the NCAA into what it can be - a fair and impartial promoter of collegiate athletics.

You're first sentence is correct. They have tried changing staff and leadership before. Their genetic structure will not allow them to morph into something as foreign to them as "fair and impartial promoter of collegiate athletics". They are too steeped in the money and power vortex. They must be dismantled; and a completely new system and organization will need to be formed that is attuned to college athletics as it has evolved.

February 22, 2013  10:04 AM ET
QUOTE(#2):

Miami is as guilty as Alabama was when they got about 27 lost scholarships. I expect Miami to get no less than that.

It's worse than that Joe. This is one of the worst cases I have ever heard or read about...and I've been around for over 60 years. Just look at some of the pictures and evidence that we have already seen. There is no way that Shalala isn't involved in this all the way up to her panties. Well, boxers in her case.

 
February 22, 2013  10:07 AM ET
QUOTE(#18):

You're first sentence is correct. They have tried changing staff and leadership before. Their genetic structure will not allow them to morph into something as foreign to them as "fair and impartial promoter of collegiate athletics". They are too steeped in the money and power vortex. They must be dismantled; and a completely new system and organization will need to be formed that is attuned to college athletics as it has evolved.

Begs the question as to what college athletics has evolved into. If one looks at the long list of college sports offered and played at most major universities, then the NCAA has sheparded them well. It's the money-maker sports (notably football and basketball) with which the Association has had the biggest headaches.

Are you suggesting that a completely new entity be made that has oversight of those two sports only? Do we then concede the de facto semi-professional status already attached to the money-makers?

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