Truth & Rumors > NFL

Is Goodell turning the NFL into a pillow fighting league?

Views
1848
Comments
23

03:46 AM ET 03.22 | Due to the increasing number of concussion-driven lawsuits, the NFL may be contemplating a major rule change that could alter the game dramatically. The new proposed rule will make it illegal for a ballcarrier to lead with the crown of his helmet when outside of the tackle box. The proposal would make it a 15-yard penalty for either the ballcarrier or the tackler to initiate contact with the crown of their helmet. The league called it a necessary safety measure and a next step in the efforts to protect players from head injuries. Commissioner Goodell's mission is to ---or just to stop the lawsuits from coming in. At this point, the league's war against lawsuit concussions is getting out of hand. What exactly is a ballcarrier in the open field supposed to do when a linebacker or safety is running at him full steam? Keep their head up and wait for their face to be broken? These football players have been playing the game for years, so they can't just turn off a switch and forget how they've been taught to play since pee-wee football. It's instinct.

Empire Writes Back

Roger Goodell, Getty Image/Christian Petersen Roger Goodell, Getty Image/Christian Petersen
March 22, 2013  07:07 PM ET

Well at least hockey's still a tough sport.

Comment #2 has been removed
March 22, 2013  07:22 PM ET

Football is a collision sport.


Collisions cause concussions.


If you want to play football, know the consequences.



This is tiresome.

March 22, 2013  07:58 PM ET

Goodell never played the game. he has no idea of the split second decisions that must be made, so he doesn't understand the implications of these rule changes. His job is protect the owners interests and investments. The bottom line is all that counts to him and the owners. If people still watch things like the pro bowl, they will continue to watch as the NFL turns into flag football. It's all about the money. The fines these rules generate take money from the players and put it back into the coffers of the owners.

March 22, 2013  08:21 PM ET

This isn't Goodell, it is the Owners.
They are facing a massive legal liabiltiy problem if they have to acknowledge they knew of the risks of concussions and didn't try to do anything about it.
Player's lives have been altered, and they have support in the courts, so the owners better deal with the issue or they will pay settlements beyond their financial capacity.
The game of football is up for grabs, and anyone who doesn't understand this is in denial.
If I owned an NFL franchise I'd be selling now, with the buyer taking all contingent liabilities as part of the deal.

March 22, 2013  08:24 PM ET

So when the tackle box is a full blitz mash a running back gets penalized trying to explode out while he can, in the most ball protective position a rb can use. He partially covers over the ball with his helmet to avoid the strip while he drives for yds.

Yeah, the mechanics of this are well thought out.

March 22, 2013  08:27 PM ET

It will be nice when defenses know that all they have to do is pack that box on any running play and be guaranteed a good chance of drawing a def15 if they can't stop the guy. Sweet time to be on defense.

March 22, 2013  08:28 PM ET

So; no more running between the tackles is where this goes, huh?

March 22, 2013  08:39 PM ET

This should go over great with fans. I'm very enthused about this advance in safety, as well as in ending this litigation via concussion scenario.

What's really pathetic is that advisors for a trillion dollar franchise can't come up with something slightly less pathetic. Especially in a full knowledge of extreme risk environment. These employees that get many millions of dollars per year know the risk they enter into; and scratch and claw to be that guy. They don't HAVE to do this work. If the stadium doesn't fall on them, they don't have much right to sue.

March 22, 2013  08:57 PM ET

I think we should just pour money into the Lingerie League. Screw Choirboy all 32 owners and their lawyers.

March 22, 2013  09:04 PM ET

So then what's the next big improvement for the game? Marshmallow balloon body armor? Would football return to running between the tackles then? Maybe just marshmallows for offense? Would that work? Then, just as with this, would still pretty much assure victory for the first defense on the field.

March 22, 2013  11:05 PM ET
QUOTE(#5):

This isn't Goodell, it is the Owners.They are facing a massive legal liabiltiy problem if they have to acknowledge they knew of the risks of concussions and didn't try to do anything about it.Player's lives have been altered, and they have support in the courts, so the owners better deal with the issue or they will pay settlements beyond their financial capacity.The game of football is up for grabs, and anyone who doesn't understand this is in denial. If I owned an NFL franchise I'd be selling now, with the buyer taking all contingent liabilities as part of the deal.

well said. the flood of lawsuits is already underway.

March 22, 2013  11:37 PM ET

Personally, I think we need to get away from the warrior mentality. These guys are played up as modern day gladiators, so is it really hard to imagine that they play as they do? Think about how much "true tackling" is becoming a lost art for the sake of "running into guys really hard" and hitting to injure. I agree that football is a collision sport and you have to pay to play, but where in spirit of the game is it "ok" and "fair" to take away a man's ability to provide for himself and/or his family because you want to be on sports center and win hit of the year? It's true... Sometimes hard hits happen and bell's get rung, but that shouldn't be the reason why they play, nor the reason why we watch.

This brings to mind the fines levied against players who've "broken the rules" in regards to hits on other players. More specifically, I think about Ed Reed. At first I thought, "Ok, he just hit the guy hard. Where's the harm in that?" However, upon further reflection I can see why. Simply put it's the way he went about the play. He wasn't making a football play in the sense of trying to tackle a guy and stop him from completing a play. He was just looking to "bring the lumber". Sure, it's a subtle thing to most, but I can understand the reasoning.

For me, the bottom line is this... I think football is the one true team sport. For all the hype and glorification that's heaped on individuals, there isn't a soul on that field who does anything on his own. Everything that happens comes as a result of someone else doing their respective job and I love the game for that reason. What I don't like is all the stupid preening and posing that goes on and especially the aforementioned "warrior mentality" that's promoted. These guys aren't warriors... They're highly skilled athletes and should be treated and perceived as such. As an athlete I've always believed that it was my responsibility to do everything I could "within the rules of the game" to keep my opponent from doing his job effectively. The challenge was in doing it with skill, talent and mental tenacity... Not violence. Athletes should respect the game enough to want to play it at the highest level of their ability. Not look for reasons to take a guy out because you can't stop him. At the end of the day, if a player lacks the talent, he will be exposed and it doesn't matter how dirty he is or how hard he hits.

March 23, 2013  01:00 AM ET

I look at it this way it is just offensive spearing if it is illegal for the defense it should be illegal for the offense.

March 23, 2013  02:30 AM ET

Time to fire this SOB.

March 23, 2013  02:35 AM ET

Protect the merchandise? I guess I'll be watching more MMA fights.

March 23, 2013  04:59 AM ET

Robot Football League looks better every year, don't it? That's where the litigation for things the employee knowingly risks thing goes. Apparently professional football players that have gone to college don't understand that fact about big industry. Few things have driven employee replacement by machines than these specific kinds of lawsuits.

Remember when Steve Young wanted to keep playing, knowing the damage he had taken, and his risk for more; being one of the top targets of NFL defenses, and making a good portion of his money on the run himself? At least the Niners wouldn't have had to worry about him turning around and suing. Another classic hallmark of teams hiring character-or not.

Bottom line is that these guys are supposed to know what they are doing, every one of them on that field. 100% of the time; at gamespeed plus pissed off. They spent more than a decade, most of them, including college education, learning about what they were committing to for a trade--and looking for special skills to make it rougher and more dangerous. No player has a right to sue for injuries he knows are very likely in the work environment, and that includes concussion or retinal detachment or a freakin busted neck. Do they get to sue for ligament damage? Turf Toe? A broken knee? What's the difference between a concussion and a broken knee? I guess I just don't get this weak crap that tries to make it ok for employees to sue for **** they are ultimately responsible for creating. Why don't you grow some balls and create a league environment of real self responsibility once and see where that leads?

March 23, 2013  06:06 AM ET

In Nascar the drivers sign a waiver indemnifying Nascar from any liability for injuries that might come about as a result of participating in a race or practice. Every driver knows that he or she might be injured or even killed at any time while racing. The drivers are NOT suing Nascar.

That being said why doesn't the NFL put a waiver in place that simply says? "I understand that if I choose to play in the NFL I might sustain injuries that could include concussions, joint and ligament damage, bone breakage, muscle tears and numerous other types of injuries. Further, I understand that these injuries could lead to life time impairment and permanent disability. I choose to participate in the NFL as a player and I waive my right to bring about any kind of lawsuit against the NFL, NFLPA and the NFL Owners now and forever".

The bottom line is Goodell can try to change how the game is played but the players are too fast, too strong and too aggressive to keep them from being seriously injured from time to time. The lawsuits will continue. The only way to stop this would be for the players to stop acting like they don't understand the consequences of playing professional football and either quit playing if they are afraid to injure themselves or indemnify the league.

March 23, 2013  07:53 AM ET
QUOTE(#18):

That being said why doesn't the NFL put a waiver in place that simply says? "I understand that if I choose to play in the NFL I might sustain injuries that could include concussions, joint and ligament damage, bone breakage, muscle tears and numerous other types of injuries. Further, I understand that these injuries could lead to life time impairment and permanent disability. I choose to participate in the NFL as a player and I waive my right to bring about any kind of lawsuit against the NFL, NFLPA and the NFL Owners now and forever".

That's not an unreasonable question. I have to wonder if that has ever been brought up during owners meetings or any CBA discussions. Strange that players that are a part of the lawsuits haven't chosen to go after their alma maters as well... or even the NCAA? Why would a university know any more or any less about concussions than the NFL does?

 
March 23, 2013  07:57 AM ET
QUOTE(#15):

Time to fire this SOB.

Really?

He's doing this to protect the long-term interests of the owners, and they don't seem to have a problem with what he's doing to protect the NFL brand; he likely doing exactly what they want him to do.

I can see folks being bent out of shape about some of what he's done in the pat, but not this time. Former players have circled the wagons, and until any of these concussion lawsuits are dismissed, there's always the chance that the league could lose money over this. Goodell is trying to protect the league for any potential lawsuits that could show up 7-10 years from now.

He's not going anywhere.

Comment

Remember to keep your posts clean. Profanity will get filtered, and offensive comments will be removed.


Truth & Rumors

MOST POPULAR

  1. 1
    Bryant headed back to Germany
    Views
    3609
    Comments
    928
  2. 2
    Shakeup looms for White Sox
    Views
    5383
    Comments
    334
  3. 3
    Lightning may be swept aside
    Views
    1105
    Comments
    95
  4. 4
    Leonsis leaves coach, GM twisting
    Views
    1358
    Comments
    80
  5. 5
    Manning eager to get started all over again
    Views
    6947
    Comments
    75

SI.com

SI Photos