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St. Louis Rams CB Trumaine Johnson arrested for DUI

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01:13 PM ET 03.23 | Rams cornerback Trumaine Johnson was arrested in the early hours of Friday morning for driving under the influence in his old college town, Montana police reports indicate. The 23-year-old was arrested at around 3:05 a.m. for allegedly driving drunk around Missoula, where he played for the Montana Grizzlies. The charge was considered a misdemeanor, and he was released on a $700 bond roughly an hour later. Johnson had a strong first season with St. Louis, as Turf Show Times wrote in January. He was selected with a high third-round pick out of the FCS school -- the second-highest pick in school history -- despite vague talk of "character issues." He had a good showing for a St. Louis team that ended up just below .500, picking off two passes and breaking up eight. He didn't gain a starting role, instead backing up Cortland Finnegan, but showed promise for the future.

Montana Police Reports

, Kevin Hoffman-USA TODAY Sports Kevin Hoffman-USA TODAY Sports
March 23, 2013  01:20 PM ET

NFL should make a Spring League touch football to keep their players away from trouble... Or just buy an island and keep the at risk players their to enjoy.

Comment #2 has been removed
March 23, 2013  03:58 PM ET
QUOTE(#2):

Why, oh why, are so many of these guys idiots?

They are young, and they have money and time to burn.

March 23, 2013  04:50 PM ET

Why is driving treated as a right? Knowing the effects of DUI/DWI and seeing the effects of the same on everyday people, you would think that better laws (and punishments) would be put in place to deter folks from committing these infractions. Driving is a privilege... Not a right.

If laws can be passed that make carrying an unlicensed firearm an offense that demands jail time, why can't driving under the influence have similar repercussions? First offense with no casualties - Mandatory 6 month suspension and rehab... 2nd (similar) offense - Indefinite suspension, rehab and mandatory driver's education before reinstatement review. Third (similar) offense - License revoked. All offenses cumulative.

Seems fair to me.

March 23, 2013  05:26 PM ET

Might want to consult the U.S. Constitution on that one. Something about to using public thoroughfares without restriction. It's not a "privilege" as some would like you to believe. That's all just more skid marks on the public underwear.

March 23, 2013  05:40 PM ET
QUOTE(#2):

Why, oh why, are so many of these guys idiots?

I have an excellent reply, but it would be misconstrued.

Comment #7 has been removed
March 23, 2013  08:42 PM ET

I can solve the DUI problem across this country in two easy steps. Of course that would eliminate an entire industry and it will never happen.
Step 1. Stop the asinine fees and court cost and the whole money for your freedom concept. That will remove law enforcements motivation to make a lame arrest.
Step 2. Non-negotiable sentencing for the convicted drunk. Say 5 days first offense, 6 months for #2 and 3 years for #3.
That ought to fix the problem in short order. Toss in a little social program for taxi's and alternative transportation and you have a reasonable, simple solution to a simple problem.

March 24, 2013  10:19 AM ET

The guy was letting off some steam in his hometown, the cop who arrested him doesn't like him because they played high school ball together and he beat him out for the safety spot. Cop was watching him and waiting for an opportunity to lock him up.

Comment #10 has been removed
 
March 25, 2013  04:28 PM ET
QUOTE(#5):

Might want to consult the U.S. Constitution on that one. Something about to using public thoroughfares without restriction. It's not a "privilege" as some would like you to believe. That's all just more skid marks on the public underwear.

Let's say that I'm with you in principle. For the sake of clarity, I was saying that driving is a privilege in the sense that in order to lawfully operate a motor vehicle on those "thoroughfares without restriction", one must possess a license to do so. Acquiring that license requires certain standards to be met, so if a person violates those standards, then the privilege to operate a vehicle should rightfully be deterred, if not revoked.

As far as the constitution goes, amendments have been made to fit the circumstances of "present day America". That responsible parties don't do so in regards to certain matters is the problem. In this sense it's more like the "ostrich's head in the sand", than anything.

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