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Alex Rodriguez meets with MLB officials

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09:23 AM ET 07.13 | Alex Rodriguez got a taste of what's to come on Friday when he met for four hours in Tampa with Major League Baseball officials who outlined their case against him as MLB prepares to suspend Rodriguez for violating baseball's collectively bargained drug agreement. For almost a year, MLB has aggressively gathered evidence on Anthony Bosch, the owner of a South Florida performance-enhancing clinic who is believed to have distributed performance-enhancing drugs to as many as 20 players, including Rodriguez. As the Daily News has previously reported, MLB is believed to be preparing to suspend Rodriguez and other players for violating the game's collectively bargained drug agreement. Rodriguez is also being investigated for interfering with MLB's probe.

New York Daily News

Alex Rodriguez, Getty Images Alex Rodriguez, Getty Images
July 13, 2013  09:28 AM ET

Your Name Is 'Mud', Bro.

Comment #2 has been removed
Comment #3 has been removed
July 13, 2013  10:24 AM ET
QUOTE(#3):

True dat. I hate A Rod, but MLB needs to check out the Fifth Amendment...

Yup.

And dig up some solid evidence while you're at it.

July 13, 2013  10:24 AM ET
QUOTE(#3):

True dat. I hate A Rod, but MLB needs to check out the Fifth Amendment...

That only applies in a court of law, not the MLB collective bargaining agreement.

July 13, 2013  10:26 AM ET
QUOTE(#5):

That only applies in a court of law, not the MLB collective bargaining agreement.

That said, I agree with jgb's statement that covering his own azzz does not mean A-Rod is interfering with the investigation.

July 13, 2013  11:18 AM ET

He doesn't have to assist the investigation - ie - provide verbal or documentary evidence. But he cannot hinder the evidence - ie - offer to pay Bosch and others to destoy evidence or to not testify. That is what he is believed to have done and what would lead to additional sanctions.

Comment #8 has been removed
July 13, 2013  11:50 AM ET

I hope MLB takes him for a long car ride to the tolls a la Sonny Corleone. (Cue the music)

July 13, 2013  12:24 PM ET

Poor Alex just another scape goat of, Bud Light and his gang of Crooks, The billionaire Bunch, don't you think it's Time for Congress to declare Baseball a Business? The owners louvered every Home Run, Every no hitter, that the PED Group delivered, now that they got their, New Parks, New TV Deals, Higher Ticket Prices, they want to turn their backs on the guys that got them their, MLB and the player Association is just as guilty as everyone of this players for ruining our beloved game, as far as I'm concerned, the Teams should have to pay a Tax given back to each of the Cities they play in, Screw Them!!!

July 13, 2013  12:25 PM ET

I hope arod and braun both get lifetime bans. Cheaters, liars and thieves, that's their new legacy. Losers.

July 13, 2013  12:35 PM ET

Stick a pitchfork in him.

July 13, 2013  12:36 PM ET

How much different things would be if Steinbrenner's ???Plan B??? to send Mariano Rivera to the Mariners for a backup shortstop had happened. As it turned out - It was the debut of A-Rod AND Jeter that year and Rivera's career in NYC now speaks for itself

July 13, 2013  01:07 PM ET

Show me proof. Hard evidence. Selig is a puppet troll.

July 13, 2013  01:22 PM ET
QUOTE(#14):

Show me proof. Hard evidence. Selig is a puppet troll.

Hmmm, well, according to you ...

"Players have been doping or using ped's for years."

...it was already a forgone conclusion that they are cheaters. So, congratulations, your only two post on this site have somehow managed to contradict each other. Well done troll, errr, should I say "Well done a-rod".

July 13, 2013  01:33 PM ET
QUOTE(#3):

True dat. I hate A Rod, but MLB needs to check out the Fifth Amendment...

The 5th amendment only applies to criminal investigations. The Supreme Court ruled a long time ago that it does not apply to employment investigations.

July 13, 2013  01:49 PM ET

This is covered in the case Garrity v New Jersey. Essentially, an employer may impose administrative sanctions on an employee, up to and including termination, if that employee fails to cooperate fully in an employment-related investigation. Anything disclosed by the employee under the Garrity rule may not be used in a criminal investigation.

July 13, 2013  01:58 PM ET
QUOTE(#17):

Anything disclosed by the employee under the Garrity rule may not be used in a criminal investigation.

So shouldn't he cooperate then to keep his dirty laundry out of an ensuing investigation.

July 13, 2013  02:25 PM ET

Getting weary of ARoid stories, time to move on.

 
July 13, 2013  03:53 PM ET

20!

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