Truth & Rumors > MLB

What Freeman's deal says (unfortunately) about Atlanta

Views
8383
Comments
18

07:36 AM ET 02.05 | To be sure, Tuesday was a good day for the near future of Braves baseball. The team announced an eight-year contract extension for first baseman Freddie Freeman, valued at $135 million, hours after reaching a two-year, $13.3 million deal with right fielder Jason Heyward. You could have described this as the Braves committing multiyear contracts to a pair of 24-year-old stars who already have earned their first All-Star selections. But the chasm of more than $120 million tells you what this really was: a choice between the two. The Braves probably can't afford Freeman and Heyward for the long term, unless Liberty Media authorizes a higher payroll. That's unlikely. ... And so the Braves are betting on Freeman, who has been healthier and more productive than Heyward over the past three seasons.

FOX Sports

Jason Heyward, Getty Images Jason Heyward, Getty Images
February 5, 2014  07:43 AM ET

I think healthier is the key word here. Maybe they are just waiting to see how healthy Heyward can be. It's the smart move considering his history.

February 5, 2014  08:18 AM ET
QUOTE(#1):

I think healthier is the key word here. Maybe they are just waiting to see how healthy Heyward can be. It's the smart move considering his history.

Concur....

Comment #3 has been removed
Comment #4 has been removed
February 5, 2014  09:01 AM ET

The Cable TV bubble is what worries me about the future of sports (especially Baseball TV deals). These teams are signing 20+ year deals with these Cable Companies (my Phillies just re-upped with Comcast for 20 years, averaging about 100 million dollars a year to dedicate to their payroll).

Many have talked about the Cable TV bubble and can it sustain itself at this outrageous rates? I know my cable bill has gone up every year and a large part of that is because of ESPN, FOX Sports1, Big10 Network, NBC SportsNetwork and all the Sports Regional Networks. What if the Cable Landscape changes in the next 10 years and we are all watching TV differently, while these teams still have 10-15 years to go on their TV deals? I would be interested to hear someone's opinion here who works in the Cable Industry and talk more about the future of where it is all going.

February 5, 2014  09:25 AM ET

A chasm indeed.

Comment #7 has been removed
Comment #8 has been removed
February 5, 2014  10:09 AM ET

Yeah, my Directv bill keeps going up and I even cancelled the movie channels- still pay $79 a month..crazy..and my baseball package kicks back in in April..

February 5, 2014  10:10 AM ET

Freeman, while a good All-Star type first baseman, was overpaid. Surprised the Braves did that.

Comment #11 has been removed
February 5, 2014  11:50 AM ET
QUOTE(#7):

Are you concerned that the cable industry will change to the extent that the 25yr/$2.5B deal the Phillies got will seem like peanuts?I guess I'm not really sure what your concern is.

http://www.sportsonearth.com/article/53498716

The sports bubble theory is that ALL Cable Subscribers are paying these outrageous prices for these national and local sports networks, so it is sustainable now. What if there is an alternative for the non-sports fans who don't have to watch TV the traditional way anymore (even to the point of ala-carte channel tier choices?).

I can say that people like my mom and aunt could care less about ESPNU, ESPN2, FOXSports1, Comcast Sportsnet, etc, yet their cable bills are going up as much as mine every year because of these big TV deals they are making with the teams. Technology changes and many are predicting that how we watch TV 10 years from now could be totally different as we wont need cable boxes, as it could be all through the internet, etc.

Again, I am not an expert nor do I have a crystal ball, but I have read alot of articles about this pending sports bubble, and it has happened in the real estate market, the stock market, etc, why can't it happen in the TV market?

Comment #13 has been removed
February 5, 2014  01:58 PM ET
QUOTE(#13):

I understand what you're saying about the "sports bubble," but I don't see how that translates to a concern for the Phillies.

Sorry, I was talking more about the consumer rather then the Sports teams and the possible bubble for these TV contracts. You're right about the team, because a contract is a contract, so the Philllies have no worries.

The point is if non-sports fans leave Cable TV in droves to find other ways to watch TV, sports fans like us are going to have to make it up with a larger cable bill every month.

Since Sports is the only DVR proof thing on TV anymore, there are other ways to watch TV, and I believe they will be exploited in the next 10 years by various new entities. Heck, who would have thought there would be no Blockbuster Video 10 years, as Netflix and other streaming services put them out of business. So if people like my mom and aunt (and other non-sports) flee cable TV because of the outrageous monthly subscriptions they are paying for something they could care less about, then how much will the sportsfans being paying a month to make up that shortfall?

Comment #15 has been removed
February 5, 2014  05:37 PM ET
QUOTE(#4):

I wouldn't discount the "more productive" bit, CardsFan.

I agree. They can surely afford him if his performance doesn't improve. I don't see people lining up to give him a 9 figure or even a high 8 figure deal unless he improves a great deal over the next two years.

February 5, 2014  05:40 PM ET
QUOTE(#14):

Sorry, I was talking more about the consumer rather then the Sports teams and the possible bubble for these TV contracts. You're right about the team, because a contract is a contract, so the Philllies have no worries.The point is if non-sports fans leave Cable TV in droves to find other ways to watch TV, sports fans like us are going to have to make it up with a larger cable bill every month. Since Sports is the only DVR proof thing on TV anymore, there are other ways to watch TV, and I believe they will be exploited in the next 10 years by various new entities. Heck, who would have thought there would be no Blockbuster Video 10 years, as Netflix and other streaming services put them out of business. So if people like my mom and aunt (and other non-sports) flee cable TV because of the outrageous monthly subscriptions they are paying for something they could care less about, then how much will the sportsfans being paying a month to make up that shortfall?

Aren't most of these contracts with local stations which are available on any number of venues? I think these stations will be able to exploit the market no matter what delivery method is ultimately used.

 
February 5, 2014  06:15 PM ET
QUOTE(#1):

I think healthier is the key word here. Maybe they are just waiting to see how healthy Heyward can be. It's the smart move considering his history.

well tough luck for Heyward lets not forget Heyward has become more injury-prone player at early age
if you know what i mean!!!

Comment

Remember to keep your posts clean. Profanity will get filtered, and offensive comments will be removed.


Truth & Rumors

MOST POPULAR

  1. 1
    Bryant headed back to Germany
    Views
    3381
    Comments
    928
  2. 2
    Shakeup looms for White Sox
    Views
    5302
    Comments
    334
  3. 3
    Lightning may be swept aside
    Views
    1021
    Comments
    95
  4. 4
    Leonsis leaves coach, GM twisting
    Views
    1149
    Comments
    79
  5. 5
    Manning eager to get started all over again
    Views
    6855
    Comments
    74

SI.com

SI Photos